N.F.L. Draft 2018 Round 2 and 3 Live Updates


The second round was scattered with several other notable picks:

At 37th over all, the Indianapolis Colts took Auburn’s Braden Smith, their second offensive lineman of the draft, reflecting the need to keep their ailing quarterback, Andrew Luck, protected in the pocket.

The Tennessee Titans took Harold Landry of Boston College, a linebacker, at 42nd over all. Along with Alabama’s Rashaan Evans, who was picked 22nd Thursday night, the Titans took two linebackers — which is the same position the first-year head coach Mike Vrabel played in the N.F.L., most notably for the Patriots.

After trading the 32nd overall pick on Thursday night to the Baltimore Ravens, who used it on Louisville quarterback Lamar Jackson, the Philadelphia Eagles traded up to select South Dakota State tight end Dallas Goedert.

With the second round’s 15th pick, the Arizona Cardinals took Texas A&M wide receiver Christian Kirk. A native of the Phoenix area, Kirk went lower than many expected. He is seen as a complement to, and perhaps an eventual successor to, Larry Fitzgerald, the heart of the Cardinals franchise. It is not clear whether Kirk will catch his first pass from Josh Rosen, the U.C.L.A. quarterback whom the Cardinals picked 10th over all on Thursday, or from the veteran Sam Bradford.

Derrius Guice, the Louisiana State running back considered one of the biggest talents at his position, fell to nearly the end of the second round, the 59th overall pick, partly because of reports about unspecified off-field problems. The Washington Redskins decided to take a chance on him.

The final pick of the second round was slated to go to the Browns, but they traded it to the Colts, who picked Tyquan Lewis, a defensive end from Ohio State. It was the Colts’ fifth pick of the first two rounds — all but one of which was an offensive or defensive lineman.

The Browns, of course, are the story of this draft. They picked first over all on Thursday night for the second year in a row, and took Mayfield, the most recent Heisman Trophy winner and one of four quarterbacks to go in the first 10th picks, and fourth over all, adding Ward. Browns Coach Hue Jackson said Thursday that Tyrod Taylor, the quarterback acquired in a trade with the Buffalo Bills, would be the presumptive starter this season.

The Browns are used to picking high, which illustrates a larger point about the franchise: It has a poor track record of converting enviable draft positions into star players. Recent first-round busts include running back Trent Richardson and quarterbacks Brady Quinn, Brandon Weeden and Johnny Manziel. It helps explain why the Browns have finished with just one winning record since the 2002 season, which was the last time they made the playoffs.

Retired veterans announced picks for their former teams after accompanying Commissioner Roger Goodell to the podium at the Dallas Cowboys’ stadium in Arlington, Tex., partly neutralizing the boos that typically greet the commissioner.

The Hall of Fame running back Jim Brown announced Cleveland’s picks. Proclaiming the Tennessee Titans’ selection, quarterback Vince Young referred to the college team he led to a national championship after the 2005 season, telling the Texas crowd: “Hook ’em, Horns.”

The Giants’ selection was announced by defensive end Justin Tuck, who seemed to relish playing the heel to the hometown crowd, bathing in boos delivered by Cowboys fans as he referred to the rival Giants as “the greatest franchise in all of sports.”

Photo

Georgia running back Nick Chubb at the combine. He was also chosen by the Browns, who had the third pick of the second round as well as the first.

Credit
Michael Conroy/Associated Press

The former Patriots receiver Deion Branch cupped his hand to his ear, pro wrestling style, during his turn.

But their performances were surpassed by kicker David Akers, who announced the second-round pick for the Philadelphia Eagles, the defending Super Bowl champions and another archrival of the Cowboys. “Hey Dallas,” he yelled. “The last time you were in the Super Bowl, these draft picks weren’t born!”

How to watch: The second round is over. The third round is being televised on Fox, ESPN2 and NFL Network. You can stream it on WatchESPN, Fox Sports Go and NFL.com.

N.F.L. Draft Round 2

33. Cleveland Browns: Austin Corbett, G, Nevada

34. Giants: Will Hernandez, G, Texas-El Paso

35. Cleveland Browns: Nick Chubb, RB, Georgia

36. Indianapolis Colts: Darius Leonard, LB, South Carolina State

37. Indianapolis Colts: Braden Smith, G, Auburn

38. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Ronald Jones II, RB, Southern California

39. Chicago Bears: James Daniels, C, Iowa

40. Denver Broncos: Courtland Sutton, WR, Southern Methodist

41. Tennessee Titans: Harold Landry, LB, Boston College

42. Miami Dolphins: Mike Gesicki, TE, Penn State

43. Detroit Lions: Kerryon Johnson, RB, Auburn

44. San Francisco: Dante Pettis, WR, Washington

45. Green Bay Packers: Josh Jackson, CB, Iowa

46. Kansas City Chiefs: Breeland Speaks, LB, Mississippi

47. Arizona Cardinals: Christian Kirk, WR, Texas A&M

48. Los Angeles Chargers: Uchenna Nwosu, LB, Southern California

49. Philadelphia Eagles: Dallas Goedert, TE, South Dakota State

50. Dallas Cowboys: Connor Williams, G, Texas

51. Chicago Bears: Anthony Miller, WR, Memphis

52. Indianapolis Colts: Kemoko Turay, LB, Rutgers

53. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: M.J. Stewart, CB, North Carolina

54. Cincinnati Bengals: Jessie Bates III, S, Wake Forest

55. Carolina Panthers: Donte Jackson, CB, Louisiana State

56. New England Patriots: Duke Dawson, CB, Florida

57. Oakland Raiders: P.J. Hall, DT, Sam Houston State

58. Atlanta Falcons: Isaiah Oliver, CB, Colorado

59. Washington Redskins: Derrius Guice, RB, Louisiana State

60. Pittsburgh Steelers: James Washington, WR, Oklahoma State

61. Jacksonville Jaguars: D.J. Chark, WR, Louisiana State

62. Minnesota Vikings: Brian O’Neill, OT, Pittsburgh

63. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Carlton Davis, CB, Auburn

Photo

Browns fans cheering during the first round of the N.F.L. draft on Thursday.

Credit
Michael Ainsworth/Associated Press

64. Indianapolis Colts: Tyquan Lewis, DE, Ohio State

N.F.L. Draft Round 3

65. Oakland Raiders: Brandon Parker, OT, North Carolina

66. Giants: Lorenzo Carter, LB, Georgia

67. Cleveland Browns: Chad Thomas, DE, Miami

68. Houston Texans: Justin Reid, S, Stanford

69. Giants: B.J. Hill, DT, North Carolina State

70. San Francisco 49ers: Fred Warner, LB, Brigham Young

71. Denver Broncos: Royce Freeman, RB, Oregon

72. Jets: Nathan Shepherd, DT, Fort Hays State

73. Miami Dolphins: Jerome Baker, LB, Ohio State

74. Washington Redskins: Geron Christian, OT, Louisville

75. Kansas City Chiefs: Derrick Nnadi, DT, Florida State

76. Pittsburgh Steelers: Mason Rudolph, QB, Oklahoma State

77. Cincinnati Bengals: Sam Hubbard, DE, Ohio State

78. Cincinnati Bengals: Malik Jefferson, LB, Texas

79. Seattle Seahawks: Rasheem Green, DE, Southern California

80. Houston Texans: Martinas Rankin, C, Mississippi State

81. Dallas Cowboys: Michael Gallup, WR, Colorado State

82. Detroit Lions: Tracy Walker, S, Louisiana-Lafayette

83. Baltimore Ravens: Orlando Brown, OT, Oklahoma

84. Los Angeles Chargers: Justin Jones, DT, North Carolina State

85. Carolina Panthers: Rashaan Gaulden, CB, Tennessee

86. Baltimore Ravens: Mark Andrews, TE, Oklahoma

87. Oakland Raiders: Arden Key, LB, Louisiana State

88. Green Bay Packers: Brad Jones, LB, Colorado

89. Los Angeles Rams: Joseph Noteboom, OT, Texas Christian

90. Atlanta Falcons: Deadrin Senat, DT, South Florida

91. New Orleans Saints: Tre’Quan Smith, WR, Central Florida

92. Pittsburgh Steelers: Chukwuma Okorafor, OT, Western Michigan

93. Jacksonville Jaguars: Ronnie Harrison, S, Alabama

94. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Alex Cappa, OT, Humboldt State

95. San Francisco 49ers: Tarvarius Moore, S, Southern Miss

96. Buffalo Bills: Harrison Phillips, DT, Stanford

97. Arizona Cardinals (Compensatory)

98. Houston Texans (Compensatory)

99. Denver Broncos (Compensatory)

100. Cincinnati Bengals (Compensatory)

Continue reading the main story

N.F.L. Draft 2018 Round 2 and 3 Live Updates


The second round was scattered with several other notable picks:

At 37th over all, the Indianapolis Colts took Auburn’s Braden Smith, their second offensive lineman of the draft, reflecting the need to keep their ailing quarterback, Andrew Luck, protected in the pocket.

The Tennessee Titans took Harold Landry of Boston College, a linebacker, at 42nd over all. Along with Alabama’s Rashaan Evans, who was picked 22nd Thursday night, the Titans took two linebackers — which is the same position the first-year head coach Mike Vrabel played in the N.F.L., most notably for the Patriots.

After trading the 32nd overall pick on Thursday night to the Baltimore Ravens, who used it on Louisville quarterback Lamar Jackson, the Philadelphia Eagles traded up to select South Dakota State tight end Dallas Goedert.

With the second round’s 15th pick, the Arizona Cardinals took Texas A&M wide receiver Christian Kirk. A native of the Phoenix area, Kirk went lower than many expected. He is seen as a complement to, and perhaps an eventual successor to, Larry Fitzgerald, the heart of the Cardinals franchise. It is not clear whether Kirk will catch his first pass from Josh Rosen, the U.C.L.A. quarterback whom the Cardinals picked 10th over all on Thursday, or from the veteran Sam Bradford.

Derrius Guice, the Louisiana State running back considered one of the biggest talents at his position, fell to nearly the end of the second round, the 59th overall pick, partly because of reports about unspecified off-field problems. The Washington Redskins decided to take a chance on him.

The final pick of the second round was slated to go to the Browns, but they traded it to the Colts, who picked Tyquan Lewis, a defensive end from Ohio State. It was the Colts’ fifth pick of the first two rounds — all but one of which was an offensive or defensive lineman.

The Browns, of course, are the story of this draft. They picked first over all on Thursday night for the second year in a row, and took Mayfield, the most recent Heisman Trophy winner and one of four quarterbacks to go in the first 10th picks, and fourth over all, adding Ward. Browns Coach Hue Jackson said Thursday that Tyrod Taylor, the quarterback acquired in a trade with the Buffalo Bills, would be the presumptive starter this season.

The Browns are used to picking high, which illustrates a larger point about the franchise: It has a poor track record of converting enviable draft positions into star players. Recent first-round busts include running back Trent Richardson and quarterbacks Brady Quinn, Brandon Weeden and Johnny Manziel. It helps explain why the Browns have finished with just one winning record since the 2002 season, which was the last time they made the playoffs.

Retired veterans announced picks for their former teams after accompanying Commissioner Roger Goodell to the podium at the Dallas Cowboys’ stadium in Arlington, Tex., partly neutralizing the boos that typically greet the commissioner.

The Hall of Fame running back Jim Brown announced Cleveland’s picks. Proclaiming the Tennessee Titans’ selection, quarterback Vince Young referred to the college team he led to a national championship after the 2005 season, telling the Texas crowd: “Hook ’em, Horns.”

The Giants’ selection was announced by defensive end Justin Tuck, who seemed to relish playing the heel to the hometown crowd, bathing in boos delivered by Cowboys fans as he referred to the rival Giants as “the greatest franchise in all of sports.”

Photo

Georgia running back Nick Chubb at the combine. He was also chosen by the Browns, who had the third pick of the second round as well as the first.

Credit
Michael Conroy/Associated Press

The former Patriots receiver Deion Branch cupped his hand to his ear, pro wrestling style, during his turn.

But their performances were surpassed by kicker David Akers, who announced the second-round pick for the Philadelphia Eagles, the defending Super Bowl champions and another archrival of the Cowboys. “Hey Dallas,” he yelled. “The last time you were in the Super Bowl, these draft picks weren’t born!”

How to watch: The second round is over. The third round is being televised on Fox, ESPN2 and NFL Network. You can stream it on WatchESPN, Fox Sports Go and NFL.com.

N.F.L. Draft Round 2

33. Cleveland Browns: Austin Corbett, G, Nevada

34. Giants: Will Hernandez, G, Texas-El Paso

35. Cleveland Browns: Nick Chubb, RB, Georgia

36. Indianapolis Colts: Darius Leonard, LB, South Carolina State

37. Indianapolis Colts: Braden Smith, G, Auburn

38. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Ronald Jones II, RB, Southern California

39. Chicago Bears: James Daniels, C, Iowa

40. Denver Broncos: Courtland Sutton, WR, Southern Methodist

41. Tennessee Titans: Harold Landry, LB, Boston College

42. Miami Dolphins: Mike Gesicki, TE, Penn State

43. Detroit Lions: Kerryon Johnson, RB, Auburn

44. San Francisco: Dante Pettis, WR, Washington

45. Green Bay Packers: Josh Jackson, CB, Iowa

46. Kansas City Chiefs: Breeland Speaks, LB, Mississippi

47. Arizona Cardinals: Christian Kirk, WR, Texas A&M

48. Los Angeles Chargers: Uchenna Nwosu, LB, Southern California

49. Philadelphia Eagles: Dallas Goedert, TE, South Dakota State

50. Dallas Cowboys: Connor Williams, G, Texas

51. Chicago Bears: Anthony Miller, WR, Memphis

52. Indianapolis Colts: Kemoko Turay, LB, Rutgers

53. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: M.J. Stewart, CB, North Carolina

54. Cincinnati Bengals: Jessie Bates III, S, Wake Forest

55. Carolina Panthers: Donte Jackson, CB, Louisiana State

56. New England Patriots: Duke Dawson, CB, Florida

57. Oakland Raiders: P.J. Hall, DT, Sam Houston State

58. Atlanta Falcons: Isaiah Oliver, CB, Colorado

59. Washington Redskins: Derrius Guice, RB, Louisiana State

60. Pittsburgh Steelers: James Washington, WR, Oklahoma State

61. Jacksonville Jaguars: D.J. Chark, WR, Louisiana State

62. Minnesota Vikings: Brian O’Neill, OT, Pittsburgh

63. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Carlton Davis, CB, Auburn

Photo

Browns fans cheering during the first round of the N.F.L. draft on Thursday.

Credit
Michael Ainsworth/Associated Press

64. Indianapolis Colts: Tyquan Lewis, DE, Ohio State

N.F.L. Draft Round 3

65. Oakland Raiders: Brandon Parker, OT, North Carolina

66. Giants: Lorenzo Carter, LB, Georgia

67. Cleveland Browns: Chad Thomas, DE, Miami

68. Houston Texans: Justin Reid, S, Stanford

69. Giants: B.J. Hill, DT, North Carolina State

70. San Francisco 49ers: Fred Warner, LB, Brigham Young

71. Denver Broncos: Royce Freeman, RB, Oregon

72. Jets: Nathan Shepherd, DT, Fort Hays State

73. Miami Dolphins: Jerome Baker, LB, Ohio State

74. Washington Redskins: Geron Christian, OT, Louisville

75. Kansas City Chiefs: Derrick Nnadi, DT, Florida State

76. Pittsburgh Steelers: Mason Rudolph, QB, Oklahoma State

77. Cincinnati Bengals: Sam Hubbard, DE, Ohio State

78. Cincinnati Bengals: Malik Jefferson, LB, Texas

79. Seattle Seahawks: Rasheem Green, DE, Southern California

80. Houston Texans: Martinas Rankin, C, Mississippi State

81. Dallas Cowboys: Michael Gallup, WR, Colorado State

82. Detroit Lions: Tracy Walker, S, Louisiana-Lafayette

83. Baltimore Ravens: Orlando Brown, OT, Oklahoma

84. Los Angeles Chargers: Justin Jones, DT, North Carolina State

85. Carolina Panthers: Rashaan Gaulden, CB, Tennessee

86. Baltimore Ravens: Mark Andrews, TE, Oklahoma

87. Oakland Raiders: Arden Key, LB, Louisiana State

88. Green Bay Packers: Brad Jones, LB, Colorado

89. Los Angeles Rams: Joseph Noteboom, OT, Texas Christian

90. Atlanta Falcons: Deadrin Senat, DT, South Florida

91. New Orleans Saints: Tre’Quan Smith, WR, Central Florida

92. Pittsburgh Steelers: Chukwuma Okorafor, OT, Western Michigan

93. Jacksonville Jaguars: Ronnie Harrison, S, Alabama

94. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Alex Cappa, OT, Humboldt State

95. San Francisco 49ers: Tarvarius Moore, S, Southern Miss

96. Buffalo Bills: Harrison Phillips, DT, Stanford

97. Arizona Cardinals (Compensatory)

98. Houston Texans (Compensatory)

99. Denver Broncos (Compensatory)

100. Cincinnati Bengals (Compensatory)

Continue reading the main story

NFL Draft 2018 Live: Round 1 Pick-by-Pick Updates


20. Detroit Lions: Frank Ragnow — C, Arkansas

Ragnow wasn’t on many draft boards at the start of this year’s draft process, but he rose quickly as people took a closer look at his film and his combine results. At 6-foot-5 and 325 pounds, he is enormous for a center, and he plays the game with a physical style that is what a lot of teams hope for at the position. He’s not a top-tier athlete, and may struggle with faster players, but he will fall back on a big personality and a solid amount of coachability to get where he needs to be.

How he fits: This is a bit of a reach at 20, with plenty of players left on the board with better pedigrees, but the Lions must have fallen in love with the thought of him at center, and they figured he would not be there when they pick again at 51.

Raiders Trade a Third-Round Pick for Steelers’ Martavis Bryant

It didn’t involve a first-round pick but the Oakland Raiders made one of the biggest moves of the day by trading a third-rounder (No. 75) for Pittsburgh’s Martavis Bryant. A big-play wide receiver who stands 6 feet 4 inches, Bryant has at times looked like an emerging superstar but he had off-field problems lead to him missing a season with a suspension and once he came back the team never seemed to warm back up to him. A new start with Derek Carr throwing to him in Oakland could be huge for both him and the Raiders.

19. Dallas Cowboys: Leighton Vander Esch — LB, Boise State

A 6-foot-4, 256-pound linebacker with a nose for the ball, Vander Esch is an athletic freak who developed into a pro prospect in college after not having made much noise in high school. He looks and plays like a former basketball player, and has shown an ability to make tough tackles, but there is a sense that he is still learning the game after just one year as a starter in college.

How he fits: The Cowboys needed more defense and they are hoping Vander Esch can be a diamond in the rough. It must have killed Jerry Jones to not take a player more worthy of headlines (like Alabama’s Calvin Ridley) but Vander Esch might be the smarter pick. There is some bust potential, however, if he plateaus in development.

18. Green Bay Packers: Jaire Alexander — CB, Louisville

The Packers had traded down earlier in the draft, but with Alexander available they went back up in a trade with Seattle. They gave up the No. 25 pick along with picks in the third- and sixth-rounds, but they get a guy who was one of the two top cornerbacks left on the board. It is not great when you’re an undersized cornerback to have spent the bulk of your junior season either out with an injury or limited by said injury. But Alexander showed enough skill in his sophomore season to make him a worthy first-round pick, even if the team selecting him feels he will need to find a permanent home as a nickel corner to help protect him. A good performance at the combine helped rescue some of the draft stock that had tanked based on his lost 2017 season.

How he fits: The Packers’ secondary was a huge liability last year so they tried to address that need with a player who carries a solid amount of risk but understands the position well and could be a top cornerback if things go right. He’s also a talented punt returner, something the Packers need. He’s certainly exciting and Green Bay just has to hope he can turn that outsized attitude into a consistent career.

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17. Los Angeles Chargers: Derwin James — S, Florida State

He only played 26 games in college, but James has the perfect size (6-foot-2, 215 pounds), strength (21 reps on the bench press) and speed (4.47 in the 40-yard dash) to be a game-changing safety. His game could use some refinement but he has continued to improve and his big personality should make him a leader on the field. Some injuries in the past, including an A.C.L. repair, should be noted, but any flaws he has on the field are correctable through coaching.

How he fits: It was a long wait, but James looked ecstatic to be heading to Los Angeles. He immediately strengthens the middle of the field for a defense that was strongest on the edges and the Chargers got a player who is a top-10 talent at 17.

16. Buffalo Bills: Tremaine Edmunds — LB, Virginia Tech

The Bills already pulled one trade in this draft to get quarterback Josh Allen and now they’ve done another to get Edmunds. They gave up the Nos. 22 and 65 in exchange for the 16th pick and a fifth-rounder — and that might be a steal for this guy. Standing 6 foot 5 inches with long arms and a fairly narrow frame, Edmunds does not look like a typical linebacker, but the son of Ferrell Edmunds, a two-time Pro Bowler at tight end, uses his size and as a huge advantage to succeed at any of the linebacker positions. There are few players to match him up with historically, but one similar player was Julian Peterson, a tall linebacker who on any given play could line up at safety, any linebacker position, or even as a defensive end. The concerns about Edmunds rest on whether he has the next-level instincts that truly great linebackers tend to possess. That will not be an issue for several years, however, as he can compensate so much athletically that he has time to learn the finer details of the game while still being a star.

How he fits: There was no reason for anyone to believe that Edmunds would still be available this deep in the draft, so the Bills’ rebuilding process got another jolt with the selection of an absolutely huge inside linebacker who can do so many things that he can help all over the field. He might have a rough adjustment to the N.F.L., especially since he’s still a teenager, but he’ll get there.

15. Oakland Raiders: Kolton Miller — OT, U.C.L.A.

Miller is a giant at 6-foot-9, but he is fairly slender for a tackle at 309 pounds. While he has athleticism to spare for a player at his position, he has not quite figured out how to let his length compensate for his limitations in terms of a strong base. That will probably require an adjustment period at the pro level, but a player of his size who moves like can is such a rarity that teams will not require much convincing to be patient.

How he fits: The Raiders had been strong on the offensive line in recent years, but they’ve had some turnover and some injuries so they selected a mammoth left tackle to protect Derek Carr’s blind side. It could be a few years before he’s worthy of his lofty draft position, but there is reason to believe he will be there. At 6-foot-9, all Miller needs is the right coach to figure out how to best utilize his perfect size at tackle.

14. New Orleans Saints: Marcus Davenport — LB/DE, Texas-San Antonio

The Saints paid a huge price to get Davenport. They sent Green Bay the Nos. 27 and 147 picks along with a first-rounder next year. A tall (6-foot-6) and fairly slender (264 pounds) edge rusher, Davenport has gotten steadily bigger and stronger since entering college and could presumably continue to develop, which would certainly help if a team hopes to use him as a defensive end in a 4-3 scheme. He’s fast and aggressive, but his burst is somewhat lacking as are his instincts. That all adds up to him being far from a sure thing, but having the potential to be something special in the right environment.

How he fits: This one is a surprise. The Saints sent a nice package of picks to Green Bay to get an edge rusher who is undoubtedly a difference-maker on defense but isn’t the type of guy who most draft boards had rated highly enough to warrant such an outlay. If Davenport starts piling up sacks at the pro level no one will question this pick, but any rookie struggles will be compounded by the knowledge that the team gave up next year’s first-round pick as well.

13. Washington Redskins: Da’Ron Payne — DT, Alabama

A key playmaker in Alabama’s national championship victory, Payne was a 350-pound goliath at the start of his college career but slimmed down to just over 300 while remaining just as strong. He may have to add some of that bulk back in the pros, but he has shown no ill-effects in terms of power when attacking the line of scrimmage and may just be the rare slender (slender is relative in this case) tackle, who succeeds based on top-notch run-stopping ability and excellent technique.

How he fits: This is the second consecutive year that the Redskins took a defensive lineman from Alabama, so they must have liked what they got in Jonathan Allen. It was almost shocking that history didn’t repeat itself with the Redskins lucking into the best safety in the draft (Derwin James) like they did in 2004 (Sean Taylor) but Payne and Allen know each other well and could make defensive line a huge strength for the Redskins.

12: Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Vita Vea — DT, Washington

A mammoth tackle at 6-foot-4 and 347 pounds, Vea was already known for otherworldly strength and he proved it at the combine with 41 reps on the bench press. Despite that size and raw power, he moves remarkably well for an interior lineman. He could use some refinement to correct some issues, and may need a coach who can motivate him to break some bad habits, but physically he is ready to be an impact player from Day 1.

How he fits: Vea doesn’t fit. He makes room for himself. The Buccaneers got an anchor for their defensive line and they were paid with two second rounders for their trouble. There were players higher on most draft boards available, so the pick is certainly a surprise, but a defense that had plenty of holes just got a giant stopper.

11. Miami Dolphins: Minkah Fitzpatrick — S, Alabama

He was an instant success for talent-laden Alabama thanks to a nose for the ball, and that continued as he finished his three-year college career with nine interceptions, four of which he returned for touchdowns. He has played some cornerback but will probably be a safety in the N.F.L. where he will have the ability to participate in all aspects of the defense. He is a strong tackler, has great freelance instincts and, other than some questions as to his ability to handle man-to-man coverage as a corner (something he will likely not be asked to do), he should be the type of player who arrives in the pros ready to start.

How he fits: The Dolphins probably wanted a quarterback, but they didn’t want one bad enough to trade up and Fitzpatrick is a solid pick here as a defensive back who could solidify the middle of the field for Miami. It’s somewhat surprising that he went before Florida State’s Derwin James, but the Dolphins may have considered him to have more upside.

10. Arizona Cardinals: Josh Rosen — QB, U.C.L.A.

The second trade of the draft sent the tenth pick from Oakland to Arizona so the Cardinals could get their new franchise quarterback. They gave up three picks (15, 79 and 152) to get Rosen, who is not the kind of player who will wow anyone at a combine, but has good size (6-foot-4, 226 pounds) and a track record for the Bruins that suggests he has a deep understanding of the position even if he does not have the strongest arm or the most athleticism. His experience playing under center means there will not be much of a learning curve at the pro level, and he has shown the personality to be a strong leader off the field as well as on it.

The concern with Rosen is entirely how durable he will be. His narrow frame would be a concern even without his history of injury problems so a team betting big on him has to be concerned of what that could mean for him, especially if he ends up in an environment with poor pass protection.

This is the first time in the N.F.L.’s common draft era (1967 to present) where four quarterbacks were selected in the first 10 picks. While Allen and Rosen fell farther than some expected, the quarterback class has made history before any of them have thrown a pro pass.

How he fits: Sam Bradford is a good quarterback who has plenty of good football left to play, but his fragility is a huge concern. Getting a young player who can benefit from watching Bradford play before ultimately taking over is a solid move for the Cardinals. That being said, Rosen has an injury history as well, so the team has plenty of risk at the position even with two good quarterbacks on the roster.

9. San Francisco 49ers: Mike McGlinchey — OT, Notre Dame

He is the top-rated tackle in the draft, but McGlinchey is far overshadowed by his linemate Quenton Nelson. That being said, McGlinchey brings a huge frame (6-foot-8, 309 pounds with 34-inch arms) and he is pro-ready in terms of technique and instinct. The limitations to his game all revolve around his strength and his ability to deal with power rushers. If he can add some bulk without losing his mobility, that could help alleviate the concern.

How he fits: McGlinchey is the second Notre Dame offensive lineman to go in the first 10 picks, and while he’s not nearly the prospect that Nelson is, he’s a solid tackle who can be an anchor on either side of the line for San Francisco. He now has the job of protecting Jimmy Garoppolo who went from backup in New England to face of the franchise in San Francisco in the span of five games.

8. Chicago Bears: Roquan Smith — LB, Georgia

Smith is sort of the antithesis of Tremaine Edmunds. He’s not nearly as large (6-foot-1, 236 pounds) and while he has elite speed there are questions about if he is strong enough to play in the middle of the field. Where he makes up for that is in natural linebacker instincts. He is a smart player, a strong leader, and is the type of guy coaches will trust to make decisions on the field.

How he fits: The Bears’ biggest need was at linebacker and Smith fits the bill. The team is hoping he’s a new version of Brian Urlacher, and the concept is not entirely out of the realm of possibility. He could be a true anchor for their defense.

7. Buffalo Bills: Josh Allen — QB, Wyoming

The first trade of the draft. The Bills gave up the No. 12 pick and two second rounders for a chance at Allen, who is easily the most divisive of the elite quarterback prospects (and no, it’s not because of a few dumb tweets he sent while he was in high school). He’s big (6-foot-5, 237 pounds), he’s fast enough to be considered mobile (4.75-second 40) and he’s got arm strength to spare. But he developed late, which led to very little recruitment coming out of high school, and he has yet to show an ability to have the accuracy necessary to succeed in the N.F.L. The combination of a lack of ability to throw on the run, a tendency to make poor decisions, and a sense that he does not necessarily have much control of where the ball ends up leaves him as a quarterback who can look elite on one play and inept on the next. If it is simply a matter of him still learning the game, then he could develop into something special, but there is a tremendous bust risk in picking him high in the draft.

In an interview broadcast on ESPN, Allen addressed the Bills trading up for him despite the controversy over offensive tweets that he’d sent in high school. “I’m going to make them look like they’re the smartest people out there,” he said.

How he fits: With Tyrod Taylor gone and Nathan Peterman being terrible, the Bills needed a quarterback and they got one that some people thought was the top overall player in this draft. There are certainly question marks about Allen but he’s played in cold weather and he has slightly more upside than Josh Rosen, so the team is hoping they bet big and will win big.

6. Indianapolis Colts: Quenton Nelson — OG, Notre Dame

Offensive tackles have finally begun to be appreciated by a widespread audience, but guards still tend to be overlooked, which is why Nelson’s status near the top of most draft boards makes him stand out so much. At 6-foot-5 and 325 pounds he is built like a tackle, and he uses his off-the-charts power to move through a defense in a way that has inspired comparisons to Larry Allen. Only 11 guards have ever been selected in the first five picks of the draft (none since 1985), and the only one since 1988 to crack the top-nine was Jonathan Cooper who went to Arizona at No. 7 in 2013. But Nelson’s size, strength and technique make him perhaps this draft’s most can’t-miss talent.

How he fits: Colts running backs are popping bottles of champagne. Nelson is a wrecking ball and he is the type of offensive line prospect who can single-handedly make the team dangerous. It’s unusual for a guard to go this high in the draft but Nelson will instantly make their team better. He was the top offensive line prospect in the draft by a mile and the Colts, a team that theoretically doesn’t need a quarterback, recognized that he was too good to pass up.

5. Denver Broncos: Bradley Chubb — DE, North Carolina State

Chubb won both the Hendricks and Bronko Nagurski awards as the nation’s top defensive end and top overall defender thanks to his 10 sacks and 23 tackles for a loss. The numbers were impressive, but even more so because they were nearly carbon copies to what he’d done as a junior in 2016, when he had 10 sacks and 21 tackles for a loss. With a 4.65-second 40-yard dash he is among the fastest defensive linemen in the draft, but he matches that with a rangy (for his position) build of 6-foot-4 and 270 pounds. He has found success both outrunning offensive linemen and also running through them. His game could still use some pro refinement, but he has relatively few question marks for his ability to be an immediate impact player.

How he fits: Everyone expected the Broncos to take a quarterback but the team decided to reload its strength on defense by taking the best defensive player in this draft. Chubb doesn’t necessarily fill a need, but the prospect of he and Von Miller terrorizing quarterbacks makes the team’s struggles on offense at least somewhat less of an issue. They still badly need a quarterback, however.

4. Cleveland Browns: Denzel Ward — CB, Ohio State

Ward is fast. Really fast. His 4.32-second 40 tied for the fastest mark among defensive backs at the combine and he used that speed, along with strong instincts in man coverage, to find consistent success at the college level. He did not generate many turnovers, with just two interceptions over three seasons, but he broke up 15 passes as a junior thanks to his ability to read plays. On intelligence and speed he should step in as a starter-level player immediately, with the main concern for him being his size. At 5-foot-11 and 183 pounds, he is far smaller than the receivers he will be asked to cover, and even with a 39-inch vertical leap he could be prone to losing battles for passes thrown above the shoulder level. He could also potentially be a liability in terms of tackling, though plenty of poor-tackling cornerbacks have proven their worth in the past.

How he fits: With the quarterback situation settled (the Browns hope), Cleveland took a risk by skipping over Bradley Chubb and going with Ward, the best defensive back in the draft. The Browns have Myles Garrett on the defensive line already, so they may have just wanted to get an elite talent on another level of their defense, but Ward presents at least slightly more risk than Chubb.

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Sam Darnold, after being selected by the New York Jets at No. 3

Credit
Cooper Neill for The New York Times

3. New York Jets: Sam Darnold — QB, Southern California

Darnold is the happy medium of the first-round quarterback options. At 6-foot-3 and 221 pounds he is not quite as big as Josh Allen but he has a more typical pro build than Baker Mayfield. He has the arm to make any throw and has shown decent accuracy as well, while being far more mobile than you might guess. His 40-yard dash time of 4.85 seconds was just one-hundredth of a second slower than Mayfield and wasn’t enough slower than Allen’s 4.75 for that to tip the scales in Allen’s favor. The biggest drawback with Darnold, beyond a troubling propensity for turnovers, is a slow and deliberate release that could be a major issue in the N.F.L.

How he fits: The Jets’ biggest needs were at quarterback, cornerback and edge rusher. Josh McCown can hold down the fort at quarterback for the time being and Teddy Bridgewater has a ton of potential (and a ton of risk) as a backup, but Darnold is too talented to pass up. He could easily take over the starting job this season but he has the luxury of not having to if his development goes slowly.

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Saquon Barkley, after being selected by the New York Giants at No. 2

Credit
Cooper Neill for The New York Times

2. New York Giants: Saquon Barkley — RB, Penn State

If Leonard Fournette owed Ezekiel Elliott a thank you card for going with the No. 4 pick last year, then Barkley should send both of them a gift basket. Drafting running backs at the top of the first round is cool again, and that is great timing for Barkley, who has the potential to be a special player at the pro level. Barkley runs a 4.4 40-yard dash, has a 41-inch vertical leap and did 29 reps on the bench press at the combine. Elliott didn’t participate in the bench press but was worse in the 40 (4.47 seconds) and in the leap (32.5 inches). The physical gifts were turned into production in college, with Barkley rushing for 3,843 yards and 43 touchdowns in his three years at Penn State, and developing into a solid pass-catching option out of the backfield as a junior. He does not break many tackles, and may take some time to learn pass-protection, but there is little doubt that he can be a star.

How he fits: Even with quarterback Eli Manning’s future in doubt, the Giants made the wise decision to take the best player in the draft. The three top quarterbacks available are all talented but also have some question marks about how good they will be. Almost no one doubts that Barkley will be an immediate superstar.

1. Cleveland Browns: Baker Mayfield — QB, Oklahoma

Is Mayfield essentially Johnny Manziel without as much baggage? That’s the big question for the Sooners quarterback who used his supercharged attitude and athleticism to find a great deal of success despite being on the smaller side (6 foot 1, 215 pounds). Like Manziel did in college, Mayfield has an innate ability to rally his teammates around him, he reacts well to the play unfolding in front of him and has more of an arm than some might guess. The questions for him revolve mostly around his ability to use his emotions at the pro level without having them consume him. Also, some doubt that his deep passes, which tend to hang a bit, will be as effective as they were against the less sophisticated defensive backs he faced in college.

How he fits: Cleveland has needed a quarterback since it came back into the N.F.L. in 1999. They must believe that the similarities between Mayfield and Manziel are only superficial, and they were willing to bet big on that fact. He has a little time to develop with Tyrod Taylor in town and Browns fans will have to hope that they’ve finally found the quarterback to solve what has seemed like an endless deficiency.

Before being selected with the No. 1 over all pick, Mayfield paid homage to Brett Favre in a post on Twitter.

N.F.L. Draft: First Round Order

1. Cleveland Browns

2. New York Giants

3. New York Jets (from Indianapolis Colts)

4. Cleveland Browns (from Houston Texans)

5. Denver Broncos

6. Indianapolis Colts (from New York Jets)

7. Tampa Bay Buccaneers

8. Chicago Bears

9. San Francisco 49ers

10. Oakland Raiders

11. Miami Dolphins

12. Buffalo Bills from Cincinnati Bengals

13. Washington Redskins

14. Green Bay Packers

15. Arizona Cardinals

16. Baltimore Ravens

17. Los Angeles Chargers

18. Seattle Seahawks

19. Dallas Cowboys

20. Detroit Lions

21. Cincinnati Bengals from Buffalo Bills

22. Buffalo Bills from Kansas City Chiefs

23. New England Patriots from Los Angeles Rams

24. Carolina Panthers

25. Tennessee Titans

26. Atlanta Falcons

27. New Orleans Saints

28. Pittsburgh Steelers

29. Jacksonville Jaguars

30. Minnesota Vikings

31. New England Patriots

32. Philadelphia Eagles

——

Goodell Hears Boos, Even With Cowboys Around Him

Commissioner Roger Goodell’s ruse to avoid booing by being joined on the stage by a group of Cowboys legends did not work. The boos were swift and loud, and they drowned out most of his opening remarks even as he stood with Roger Staubach, Troy Aikman and Jason Witten.

“I can’t believe you guys would boo the Cowboys,” Goodell joked.

The players got cheers when they were introduced but as they began to leave the stage Goodell said “you don’t have to go anywhere” seemingly in hopes of keeping the fans settled. Regardless, the Browns are on the clock.

What to Expect in the First Round

• The Cleveland Browns’ rebuilding process will be a major focus, as the team has the No. 1 and No. 4 picks. While no official announcement has been made, speculation is rampant that Oklahoma’s Baker Mayfield will go to Cleveland with the top pick. It’s a curious decision based on the numerous similarities between Mayfield and Johnny Manziel, who flamed out spectacularly in Cleveland. If the Browns do take Mayfield, that must mean something in his interviews convinced them the similarities are surface-level and that he is a safe bet as a franchise starter. The team can mitigate the risk some by making a safer pick with the No. 4 selection.

Marc Tracy, from AT&T Stadium in Arlington: This is my first draft, but I imagine it is bizarre even for the veterans of places like Radio City Music Hall. “JerryWorld” is massive. Two-thirds of the stadium lies vacant, and the stands themselves are not remotely full. I did spend some time down in the “Inner Circle,” the floor in front of the stage that has been segmented into 32 sections for fans of each team. Mari Lowry and Jodee McCarthy are Jets fans from the area, and each were wearing chefs’ toques. I didn’t get the joke, so they explained it to me: they hope the Jets take Baker Mayfield (get it, “baker”?) with the third overall pick.

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Credit
Cooper Neill for The New York Times

• It is expected that at least four quarterbacks — Josh Allen, Sam Darnold, Mayfield and Josh Rosen — will be taken in the first round. It would be just the ninth time that many went in the first round, and there is a chance that a fifth quarterback, Lamar Jackson, could also go on Day 1, which would tie it with 1999 for the second-most quarterbacks ever behind the 1983 draft that yielded six.

• While Allen has consistently been put among the top picks in mock drafts, he inspired the first mild controversy of this draft when some offensive tweets from his high school days were dug up by internet sleuths. Allen has apologized for the language he used — including racial epithets — and explained that he was simply young and dumb.

• The Green Bay Packers have a king’s ransom of picks, with 12 overall, but they will have to be patient as 9 of the 12 come in rounds 4 through 7. The team has had a near-constant need in the secondary in recent years, and they could use a replacement for Jordy Nelson at wide receiver, but an edge rusher could be where they end up on day 1 as they look to add some explosiveness to their defense.

• The San Francisco 49ers are in the enviable position of having had such a poor start to last season that they have a top-ten pick, but a promising enough finish that they are a potential breakout team even before they draft. Getting some skill players to complement Jimmy Garoppolo is the priority, but another young impact defender would hardly hurt, especially with no guarantee that Reuben Foster will still be with the team once his legal situation settles.

• The Giants are one of the more fascinating teams in the draft because of the elephant in the room who goes by the name Eli Manning. The team recommitted to the two-time Super Bowl winner after his brief benching last season, but the fact remains that he is 37 and has not played at an elite level in recent years. Barkley may be the safest pick for the team regardless of need at quarterback, but at some point they need a quarterback of the future and the team rarely drafts this high.

• Penn State’s Saquon Barkley could continue a recent trend of running backs being taken in the first five picks. He would be the third running back taken in that range in the last three seasons after just one — Trent Richardson in 2012 — had done so in a span of seven drafts. The other two — Ezekiel Elliott (Cowboys) and Leonard Fournette (Jaguars) — have been impressive thus far in their short N.F.L. careers. Read more about Barkley here.

• Beyond Barkley there are not a lot of obvious star candidates among the running backs and wide receivers. Alabama’s Calvin Ridley may thrive, but he’s one of just three or four receivers that are expected to go in the first round. It is even worse among running backs, where Barkley and L.S.U.’s Derrius Guice are the only ones likely to come off the board tonight.

• Commissioner Roger Goodell is used to being booed at the draft, but this year may be different as he plans to walk onto the stage with Cowboys legends Roger Staubach, Troy Aikman and Jason Witten. “I’m sure he’s going to get a good response with us being out there,” Staubach told reporters. “If they boo, all of us are in trouble.”

• The first defensive player off the board is likely to be North Carolina State’s Bradley Chubb, while the first offensive lineman is expected to be Notre Dame’s Quenton Nelson, which is notable as he is a guard rather than a tackle.

• Fans of the Chiefs, Texans and Rams will be sitting on their hands today as none of the three teams has a first-round pick. Barring trades, Kansas City will make its first pick in the second round (54th overall), while Houston (68th) and Los Angeles (87th) will be picking for the first time in the third round.

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Inside the Confidential N.F.L. Meeting to Discuss National Anthem Protests


Long said he did not wish to “lecture any team” on what quarterbacks to sign, but “we all agree in this room as players that he should be on a roster.” The owners’ responses were noncommittal. The Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie said that fighting for social justice is not “about one person.”

The New England Patriots owner Robert K. Kraft pointed to another “elephant in the room.”

“This kneeling,” he said.

“The problem we have is, we have a president who will use that as fodder to do his mission that I don’t feel is in the best interests of America,” said Kraft, who is a longtime supporter of Mr. Trump’s. “It’s divisive and it’s horrible.”

The owners were intent on finding a way to avoid Trump’s continued criticism. The president’s persistent jabs on Twitter had turned many fans against the league. Lurie, who called Trump’s presidency “disastrous,” cautioned against players getting drawn into the president’s tactics.

“We’ve got to be careful not to be baited by Trump or whomever else,” Lurie said. “We have to find a way to not be divided and not get baited.”

The Buffalo Bills owner Terry Pegula sounded anguished over the uncertainty of when Trump would take another shot at the league. “All Donald needs to do is to start to do this again,” Pegula said. “We need some kind of immediate plan because of what’s going on in society. All of us now, we need to put a Band-Aid on what’s going on in the country.”

The Jacksonville Jaguars owner Shahid Khan countered that the worst was behind them. “All the damage Trump’s going to do is done,” he said.

The owners kept returning to one bottom-line issue: Large numbers of fans and sponsors had become angry about the protests. Boycotts had been threatened and jerseys burned and — most worrisome — TV ratings were declining.

Pegula complained that the league was “under assault.” He unloaded a dizzying flurry of nautical metaphors to describe their predicament. “To me, this is like a glacier moving into the ocean,” he said. “We’re getting hit with a tsunami.” He expressed his wish that the league never be “a glacier crawling into the ocean.”

The Houston Texans owner Bob McNair was more direct. He urged the players to tell their colleagues to, essentially, knock off the kneeling. “You fellas need to ask your compadres, fellas, stop that other business, let’s go out and do something that really produces positive results, and we’ll help you.”

After the Miami Dolphins owner Stephen Ross raised the idea of a “march on Washington” by N.F.L. players and owners, Eric Reid, Kaepernick’s former teammate and the first player to kneel alongside him, brought the discussion back to Kaepernick.

Reid, who attended the meeting wearing a Kaepernick T-shirt over his dress shirt and tie, said that his former teammate was being blackballed.

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Colin Kaepernick in 2016.

Credit
Ted S. Warren/Associated Press

“I feel like he was hung out to dry,” Reid said of Kaepernick. “Everyone in here is talking about how much they support us.” The room fell quiet. “Nobody stepped up and said we support Colin’s right to do this. We all let him become Public Enemy No. 1 in this country, and he still doesn’t have a job.”

Pegula offered that he thought the league was battling a perception and “media problem.” He said it would be great for the league to find a compelling spokesman — preferably a player — to promote all of the good things they were doing together. He suggested that the league could learn from the gun lobby in this regard.

“For years we’ve watched the National Rifle Association use Charlton Heston as a figurehead,” Pegula said. “We need a spokesman.”

Anquan Boldin, a former N.F.L. wide receiver who was at the meeting, said that owners needed to be spokesmen, too. “Letting people know it’s not just the players that care about these issues, but the owners, too,” Boldin said.

Pegula didn’t address Boldin’s point except to add that it would be important for the spokesman to be black. (None of the N.F.L.’s 32 owners are black.)

“For us to have a face, as an African-American, at least a face that could be in the media,” Pegula continued, “we could fall in behind that.”

Kaepernick’s name was not mentioned again. He continues to pursue a labor grievance accusing the owners of colluding to keep him out of the league. He remains unsigned.

Before the meeting ended, owners had quoted Thomas Paine (the Falcons owner Arthur Blank), invoked Martin Luther King Jr.’s Selma march (Ross of the Dolphins) and expressed great hope for what they all could accomplish together (“We have a chance to do something monumental,” declared the Giants owner John Mara).

The meeting concluded with some participants saying how positive the session had been, and how they would all keep talking. Goodell told the group that another meeting was being scheduled. They planned to issue a “joint statement” to underscore their shared commitment.

Kraft said the statement should reflect how everyone had come together for a good cause. “It would be good if you could work in the word ‘unified’ or ‘unity’ in some fashion,” he said, referring to the joint statement.

“We could say simply, today we had a reset, and the players’ issues are our issues, and we recognize them and will work together,” Ross said.

“I like the language of ‘our issues,’ ” said DeMaurice Smith, executive director of the players’ union.

About an hour later, the league released its joint statement:

“Today owners and players had a productive meeting focused on how we can work together to promote positive social change and address inequality in our communities. NFL executives and owners joined NFLPA executives and player leaders to review and discuss plans to utilize our platform to promote equality and effectuate positive change. We agreed that these are common issues and pledged to meet again to continue this work together.”

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When — if Ever — Will the Super Bowl Champion Eagles Visit the White House?


“We have been in contact with White House representatives and are currently discussing the logistics of an upcoming visit to Washington,” a spokesman for the Eagles said on Monday, acknowledging publicly for the first time that the team had been invited. “We are honored to receive this invitation and view this not only as an opportunity to be recognized for our on-field accomplishments, but also as an opportunity to engage in productive dialogue with the leaders of our country.”

There is no formal routine for the scheduling of White House visits, though most Super Bowl winners receive an invitation soon after the game, and visits are common in March or April, when players are together but their schedules are not as hectic as they would be during the season. Last year, the New England Patriots went to the White House on April 19.

Some teams choose to visit the White House later in the year, particularly if they can combine it with a trip to play against the Redskins or the Ravens, who are based near Washington.

The Eagles will probably have several prominent no-shows if the team makes the trip from Philadelphia. After their victory over the Patriots in February, some top players, including safety Malcolm Jenkins, defensive lineman Chris Long and wide receiver Torrey Smith, said they would not visit the White House if invited.

In an interview on CNN, Mr. Smith said he would not go to a party if the host were a sexist or a racist or insulted his friends. “So why is it any different when this person has the title of president of the United States?” he said. “It’s really that simple to me. I don’t think it’s really something that I personally feel inclined to be involved with.”

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Jeffrey Lurie, owner of the Philadelphia Eagles. He called the Trump presidency “disastrous” in a private meeting with players and league executives.

Credit
Chad Batka for The New York Times

Mr. Smith added that there were “plenty of guys who said they do not plan on going” to the White House, a tradition that became an annual event during Ronald Reagan’s presidency more than three decades ago.

Two members of the Eagles, Mr. Long and LeGarrette Blount, declined to visit the White House last year when they were with the Patriots.

The Eagles’ owner, Jeffrey Lurie, is considered one of the most liberal in the league, and he is sympathetic to what Mr. Jenkins and other players have been trying to achieve. Long before he bought the team, he earned a doctoral degree in social policy and lectured on topics like incarceration rates. In the lobby at the Eagles’ training complex, he put large photos of Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Mandela and Jonas Salk, rather than sepia-tone images of the team’s best former players, to remind visitors of the team’s higher mission.

Mr. Lurie openly supported Mr. Jenkins and other players who have protested, though he encouraged them to hone their message and not be sidetracked by people accusing them of being unpatriotic.

According to the Federal Election Commission, in 2015, Mr. Lurie donated $2,700 to Hillary for America, a group supporting Hillary Clinton, as well as to the N.F.L. political action committee.

Mr. Lurie has also made his political leanings known in private league meetings, including last October at N.F.L. headquarters. Weeks after Mr. Trump attacked the league, several dozen owners, players and league executives met to discuss a plan to donate money to an array of groups fighting social injustice. At one point, a player said that it was difficult to trust the owners because they supported Mr. Trump.

Mr. Lurie took exception.

“Another fact I want to throw out there: Many of us have no interest in supporting President Trump,” Mr. Lurie said, according to a recording of the meeting obtained by The New York Times. “Yes, there are some. There are some players who do, too.”

“But this is not where you brandish a group of people because they own assets in a sport we love, supporting what many of us perceive as, you know, one disastrous presidency,” he said, using a vulgarity to emphasize “disastrous,” then adding, “Don’t quote me.”

The Trump White House has been the source of tension with other sports teams. In September, after Stephen Curry of the N.B.A. champion Golden State Warriors said that he and his teammates were considering a boycott of the visit, Mr. Trump announced that the team would not be invited.

The history of sports teams visiting the White House dates to the 19th century, when baseball teams were invited. President Jimmy Carter is believed to be the first to invite an N.F.L. team, when he welcomed the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1980. The visits became a yearly tradition during the Reagan administration, and nearly every Super Bowl champion since then has received an invitation.

The few exceptions include the Giants, in 1991, who did not go because of the first Gulf War, and the Denver Broncos in 1999, presumably because President Bill Clinton was embroiled in impeachment proceedings.

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Pro Cheerleaders Say Groping and Sexual Harassment Are Part of the Job


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Cincinnati Bengals cheerleaders before a home game in September. N.F.L. cheerleaders say they do not speak up about sexual harassment because teams warn them that they will be dismissed if they complain.

Credit
Ian Johnson/Icon Sportswire, via Getty Images

Cheerleaders for professional sports teams are often dancers with backgrounds in ballet, jazz, modern, hip-hop and tap. After beating out dozens of other dancers for the job, they have a chance to show off the athletic and dancing skills they have honed for years.

But they quickly learn that performing during sporting events is only a small part of their job description. They are also required to fulfill what often becomes the unsavory side of the job: interacting with fans at games and other promotional events, where groping and sexual harassment are common.

In interviews with dozens of current and former cheerleaders — most of them from the N.F.L., but also representing the N.B.A. and the N.H.L. — they described systematic exploitation by teams that profit by sending them into pregame tailgating and other gatherings where they are subjected to offensive sexual comments and unwanted touches by fans.

“When you have on a push-up bra and a fringed skirt, it can sometimes, unfortunately, feel like it comes with the territory,” said Labriah Lee Holt, a former cheerleader for the Tennessee Titans in the N.F.L. “I never experienced anything where someone on the professional staff or the team said something or made me feel that way. But you definitely experience that when you encounter people who have been drinking beer.”

Team officials are aware of the situation, the cheerleaders said, but do little to prevent harassment. Cheerleaders for most professional sports teams are required to mingle with fans at games and promotional events where encounters with intoxicated people can be harrowing. A former cheerleader for the Redskins recalled a particularly uncomfortable assignment: she and five teammates were sent to a fan’s home, where several men were drinking and watching a football game.

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When venturing into tailgate areas of parking lots, cheerleaders sometimes go in pairs or small groups to feel safer.

“There wasn’t any protection from it,” Ms. Holt said. “You have to run around the tailgates, go to the tents, mingle with fans and shake the pompoms. And you sometimes get the disgusting old men who have been drinking and will say something inappropriate. It is common, and the industry knows that.”

A longtime cheerleader for the Dallas Cowboys recalled a home game when her squad walked near a group of Philadelphia Eagles fans. “We were walking by, waving and smiling, and one guy caught my eye,” said the cheerleader, who requested anonymity because she, like many others, was forced to sign a nondisclosure agreement. “He looked at me and said, ‘I hope you get raped!’ That’s the kind of stuff we’d have yelled at us. Even from our fans, once they get drunk, they yell things, and you’re like, ‘Really?’ It’s part of the job. It comes with it. You’re supposed to take it.”

The Cowboys and the Titans did not respond to requests for comment. The N.F.L. declined to address cheerleaders’ specific claims. In a statement, a spokesman for the league said: “The N.F.L. and all N.F.L. member clubs support fair employment practices. Employees and associates of the N.F.L. have the right to work in a positive and respectful environment that is free from any and all forms of harassment.”

Some teams, recognizing the problem, address harassment in training and in handbooks given to cheerleaders and dance-team members. It does not stop the teams from sending women into tailgate parties, suites of high rollers or the stands.

The Dallas Cowboys taught their cheerleaders and dancers what to say to people who said offensive things or touched them inappropriately. The women were told never to upset the fans.

“We were taught, if someone’s getting handsy on you, how to navigate that,” said the former longtime Cowboys cheerleader. “We were told what to say, like, ‘That’s not very nice,’ To be sweet, not rude. Say, ‘Can I ask you to step over here?’ Use body language to help deter the situation. Never be mean. Never. Always courteous. Because if it’s not for the fans, we wouldn’t be here — that’s how we were supposed to think of this.”

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