California Today: California Today: The Opioid Crisis in Humboldt County


Those syringes are a symptom of a broader, systemic issue.

Steve Shockley, a Eureka resident who is homeless, said he “converted” to using heroin a few years ago after years of drug abuse. Like many other longtime intravenous drug users in the area, he now prefers heroin to meth, though he uses them both regularly.

Stacy Cobine, who said she worked as a nurse’s aide for many years, says that many drug users are getting abscesses from syringes; she said she had taught younger drug users proper needle technique to avoid infections and other complications.

“You would not believe the dirty using practices I’ve seen,” she said. “I just cringe thinking about it. I’ve had to teach a couple of my girlfriends’ kids how to do it right, help them do it, because it just made me so sad.”

Read the full story here.

We’re interested in hearing from people who live in rural communities in California. What are the main issues facing your area? What topics do you think have not received enough attention? Email our reporter Jose A. Del Real at jose.delreal@nytimes.com. Please include your name, town, and a phone number if you would like us to follow up.

California Online

(Please note: We regularly highlight articles on news sites that have limited access for nonsubscribers.)

Photo

Protesters marched at the U.C.L.A. campus on Monday. Thousands of University of California custodians, security guards, gardeners and other service workers are on strike to address gender pay inequalities and demand higher wages.

Credit
Jae C. Hong/Associated Press

A giant labor strike across the University of California system forced medical centers to reschedule thousands of surgeries and appointments. Some campuses also canceled classes. [Los Angeles Times]

• The Trump administration is cracking down on immigrants who illegally cross the Southwest border, threatening jail time and separating children from their parents. [The New York Times]

• What came out of the state Republican convention over the weekend? Many had hoped the party would unite behind one candidate, but John Cox earned just 55 percent of the vote. [KPCC]

Representative Kevin McCarthy, the House majority leader, used to be known around Bakersfield for selling sandwiches and cars before he went into politics. Here’s a look at his unlikely rise, and how he could become speaker of the House. [Associated Press]

• A bill limiting opioid prescriptions for minors cleared the State Legislature on Monday. [The Sacramento Bee]

• He bought a roll of Mentos at an Orange County gas station. Then an off-duty police officer pulled a gun on him. [The New York Times]

Electric cars are making inroads in California, which leads the nation in sales. But will demand grow fast enough for the state to meet its 2030 goal? [San Francisco Chronicle]

• Drive.ai, a Silicon Valley start-up, said it would start a self-driving service in Texas. It’s the first new rollout of autonomous cars in the U.S. since a self-driving Uber killed a pedestrian in March. [The New York Times]

• Senator Kamala Harris will skip the U.C. Berkeley commencement in support of striking workers. [The Los Angeles Times]

• Two California standard-setters won James Beard awards for hospitality: Zuni Café in San Francisco for Outstanding Service, and Caroline Styne, who runs Lucques, A.O.C. and other Los Angeles-area restaurants, for Outstanding Restaurateur. [The New York Times]

Los Angeles saw a record number of tourists last year, matching a statewide increase. Visitors added $22.7 billion to the county’s economy, countering fears of a slowdown. [The Los Angeles Times]

Photo

“We need things to start changing now,” said Michael Govan, Lacma’s chief executive and director.

Credit
Emily Berl for The New York Times

• The Los Angeles County Museum of Art is partnering with Arizona State University to establish a three-year program to develop a new generation of diverse curators, directors and other museum professionals. [The New York Times]

And Finally …

Photo

Fields of California poppies in North Elsinore.

Credit
Image Source/REX, via Shutterstock

Is it illegal to pick a California poppy?

Although there is no law protecting the flower, the state penal code requires written landowner permission to remove and sell plant material.

The golden flowers can be seen dotting hillsides along highways and are “an unmatched symbol of the Golden State, perhaps viewed as a floral representation of the ‘fields of gold’ sought during the Gold Rush,” according to the Department of Fish and Wildlife.

The plant was given its Latin name, Eschscholzia californica, by the French-born naturalist Adelbert von Chamisso, who visited the Bay Area in the early 19th century and studied its indigenous plants and animals. Mr. Chamisso returned to Europe, but the California State Floral Society chose the Eschscholzia californica as the state flower in 1890.

In 1996, Gov. Pete Wilson declared May 13 to 18 as Poppy Week; in 2010, April 6 was designated California Poppy Day. Public schools and educational institutions are encouraged to conduct activities in honor of the state flower, including instruction on native plants and emphasizing conservation of natural resources.

Where have you seen the California poppy? Want to submit a photo for possible publication? You can do it here.

Tell us when and where you’ve seen the flowers, and we may feature your response next week. Please include your name, age and where you live.

California Today goes live at 6 a.m. Pacific time weekdays. Tell us what you want to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com.

California Today is edited by Julie Bloom, who grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from U.C. Berkeley.

Continue reading the main story

California Today: California Today: Xavier Becerra on California vs. Trump


“People know where I’m going to go,” Mr. Becerra said. “I try to be very open with them about where we are going. And this is California.”

Even as he ticked off everything else his office was doing, Mr. Becerra said he was not surprised that the world thought that every filing that came out of Sacramento had the word “Trump” after the word “vs.”

“There’s a whole bunch that we are doing: It’s just that like everything else in the world, Donald Trump sucks up all the oxygen,” he said. “So everybody thinks California is just fixated on Donald Trump.”

California Online

(Please note: We regularly highlight articles on news sites that have limited access for nonsubscribers.)

Photo

Gov. Jerry Brown delivered the keynote address at the annual California-China Business Summit in Beverly Hills on Thursday.

Credit
Damian Dovarganes/Associated Press

• Gov. Jerry Brown pushed for greater cooperation with China in his keynote address at the annual California-China Business Summit in Beverly Hills on Thursday. “Globalization is here. We are not getting rid of it. And a trade war is stupid,” he said. [Associated Press]

The capture of the Golden State Killer wasn’t the first time investigators used a genealogy site to solve a grisly crime. The Contra Costa County detective who cracked the case used a technique similar to one that helped solve a series of murders in New Hampshire. [The New York Times]

• And detectives at the Vallejo Police Department, inspired by the successful use of DNA technology, are re-examining evidence from the infamous Zodiac Killer case in the 1960s. [San Francisco Chronicle]

• The California Republican Party convention begins Friday in San Diego. With only 25 percent of the state’s voters registered as Republicans, the party must tackle several key tasks at its gathering. [San Francisco Chronicle]

• The city of Los Angeles sued nine drug companies that handle prescription painkillers, alleging that they worsened the country’s opioid crisis with unethical marketing practices and by violating anti-racketeering laws. [The Los Angeles Times]

• Marijuana companies seeking more favorable legislation are flooding the state’s coffers; the industry has donated more than $600,000 to California political campaigns since 2016. [CALmatters]

Tuolumne County is the third — and the first in Northern California — to oppose the state’s so-called sanctuary laws against federal immigration policies. [Capital Public Radio]

• About 100 people have been sickened in California after eating raw oysters from Canada. State health officials have confirmed a norovirus outbreak. [CNN]

“Boring bonehead questions are not cool,” Elon Musk told analysts in a contentious conference call on Wednesday about Tesla’s earnings. The electric-car maker’s stocks fell after Mr. Musks’s remarks. [The New York Times]

Photo

Colin Kaepernick, left, and Eric Reid of the San Francisco 49ers knelt during the national anthem before a game in 2016.

Credit
Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press

• Eric Reid, the San Francisco 49ers safety who knelt during the national anthem at games, has filed a grievance against the N.F.L., saying owners have colluded to keep him out of a job because of his protests. [The New York Times]

• A ruling by the State Supreme Court on Tuesday could affect minor-league baseball players seeking a new wage structure and millions of dollars in back pay. [The New York Times]

• Poor residents in Fresno spend 73 percent of their income on rent, a new housing report found. The county needs more than 41,000 affordable rental homes to meet demand. [The Fresno Bee]

• The Bay Area, meanwhile, leads the state as the center of the housing crisis. A new study examines the dilemma faced by residents of the nation’s economic engine, which provides opportunity while simultaneously shutting out low- and middle-income workers. [The Mercury News]

• The Los Angeles City Council unanimously backed new regulations on Airbnb, which would bar Angelenos from renting out accommodations that are not their primary residence. [The Los Angeles Times]

Photo


Credit
Lars Leetaru

• Here are five tips for a luxurious trip to Los Angeles that won’t break the bank. [The New York Times]

And Finally …

Photo

Testing the InSight spacecraft in the Astrotech processing facility at Vandenberg Air Force Base.

Credit
Alex Valdez/USAF 30th Space Wing/NASA

If you’re planning to be up early on Saturday, you might catch a glimpse of NASA’s first planetary launch from California. The Mars InSight mission is scheduled to take off from Vandenberg Air Force Base at 4:05 a.m. Pacific time and will be visible to about 10 million Californians “from Santa Maria to San Diego,” our science reporter Ken Chang says.

Explore the mission in augmented reality here. And on Saturday, check the InSight website to make sure it’s still on schedule, then go outside and look at the western sky.

The spacecraft is headed to one of the most boring places on the red planet, but that is exactly what scientists want. The lander carries a probe that will burrow 16 feet into the ground to examine the planet’s deep interior.

InSight is expected to reach Mars on Nov. 26 at about noon. Sign up here to get a reminder of the landing on your calendar.

California Today goes live at 6 a.m. Pacific time weekdays. Tell us what you want to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com.

California Today is edited by Julie Bloom, who grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from U.C. Berkeley.

Continue reading the main story

California Today: California Today: Members of the Migrant Caravan Await Their Fate Near San Diego


“I’m going with the feeling that it’s going to be worth the effort,” Mr. Quintanillo, 30, said.

Read more of our coverage here.

California Online

(Please note: We regularly highlight articles on news sites that have limited access for nonsubscribers.)

Photo

Vice President Mike Pence visited a new stretch of the border fence in Mexicali, Mexico, on Monday.

Credit
Juan Barak/EPA, via Shutterstock

• Vice President Mike Pence arrived in the Imperial Valley for a tour of a construction site for the border barrier, just 100 miles west of the asylum seekers. [The Los Angeles Times]

• The California Supreme Court made it much more difficult for companies to classify workers as independent contractors rather than employees, dealing a blow to the gig economy model. [The New York Times]

• California is gearing up for a big fight with the Trump administration over tailpipe emissions. Here’s why the effects will be felt far beyond the Golden State. [The New York Times]

Senator Kamala Harris and other leading Democratic prospects are drawing lessons from Senator Bernie Sanders’s 2016 presidential campaign as they look ahead to 2020. [Politico]

• Mayor Eric Garcetti of Los Angeles budgeted more than $430 million for the city’s homeless, but most of it is in long-term debt. [The Los Angeles Times]

• A state program has resulted in droves of California teenagers pre-registering to vote. But will they actually head to the polls in the fall? [Orange County Register]

• A bankruptcy trustee has filed a lawsuit against Paul Manafort in Santa Ana, saying that the former Trump campaign manager falsely claimed he was a creditor in a failed real estate deal. [Reuters]

Ashley Judd sued Harvey Weinstein in Los Angeles Superior Court, saying he harmed her career by spreading lies about her after she denied his sexual requests. [The New York Times]

Photo

Whole Foods has been criticized for partnering with a Southern California restaurant named Yellow Fever.

Credit
via Facebook

• When an Asian restaurant called Yellow Fever opened its third location at a Whole Foods 365 store in Long Beach, public debate erupted over disparaging language and corporate America. [The New York Times]

• Is it possible to live in San Francisco without spending any money? A new type of bargain hunter is emerging in the city, which is full of venture-capital-backed start-ups offering free trials and discounts. [The Wall Street Journal]

• A seven-mile stretch of Highway 1 that has been closed since landslides in Big Sur last spring is expected to reopen in September. [San Francisco Chronicle]

• U.C. Berkeley students who survived the 2016 terrorist attack in Nice, France, are launching start-ups to help counter global terrorism. [Berkeley News]

• Don Nelson, the retired N.B.A. coach, spoke to us about poker, weed and the Warriors’ chances this year. [The New York Times]

Photo

A Roadies tour bus in Joshua Tree National Park.

Credit
Roadies

• A travel company wants to take you on a road trip between San Diego and Las Vegas — via Los Angeles, Palm Springs, Joshua Tree National Park and the Grand Canyon — on a tour bus packed with luxury amenities. [The New York Times]

And Finally …

Photo

The Compton rapper Kendrick Lamar sold more than 3.5 million copies of “DAMN.” and took home the Pulitzer Prize for music.

Credit
Interscope Records, via Associated Press

When Kendrick Lamar won the Pulitzer Prize for music last month, becoming the first rapper to do so, critics and journalists marveled at the genre-breaking victory.

The triumph was more than just historic for residents of South Los Angeles, where Mr. Lamar grew up — it was also profoundly moving, an acknowledgment that their stories mattered.

Young writers and artists in the area have long venerated Mr. Lamar, whose rise from poverty to becoming one of the acclaimed musical writers of his generation is a source of hope and inspiration. Kyland Turner, a young writer and poet from Watts, said Mr. Lamar’s music helped him make sense of his own life and choices at critical moments.

“There was a long time that I didn’t know how to express myself, and Kendrick was that expression for me personally. I was young and trying to make it through the city,” said Mr. Turner, 22. “His first album, that album got me through some of the toughest parts of my life, from being evicted to having friends dying.”

Mr. Turner’s dream is to make it as a songwriter and screenwriter. He’s well on his way. He has built a following through raw performances in spoken-word events around the city, drawing from his life in South L.A.’s neighborhoods. He recently did story-consulting work on a Netflix series about South L.A., “On My Block,” and once performed at the White House.

Mr. Lamar’s Pulitzer win, said Mr. Turner, has provided a rush of inspiration for Mr. Turner and others like him.

“We knew about Kendrick before the world knew about him. To see his growth over time and for him to stay true to his community, just on a personal level growing up in the city, in L.A., Watts, Compton — it made me feel like, man, I can make it,” Mr. Turner said.

California Today goes live at 6 a.m. Pacific time weekdays. Tell us what you want to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com.

California Today is edited by Julie Bloom, who grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from U.C. Berkeley.

Continue reading the main story

California Today: California Today: Members of the Migrant Caravan Await Their Fate Near San Diego


“I’m going with the feeling that it’s going to be worth the effort,” Mr. Quintanillo, 30, said.

Read more of our coverage here.

California Online

(Please note: We regularly highlight articles on news sites that have limited access for nonsubscribers.)

Photo

Vice President Mike Pence visited a new stretch of the border fence in Mexicali, Mexico, on Monday.

Credit
Juan Barak/EPA, via Shutterstock

• Vice President Mike Pence arrived in the Imperial Valley for a tour of a construction site for the border barrier, just 100 miles west of the asylum seekers. [The Los Angeles Times]

• The California Supreme Court made it much more difficult for companies to classify workers as independent contractors rather than employees, dealing a blow to the gig economy model. [The New York Times]

• California is gearing up for a big fight with the Trump administration over tailpipe emissions. Here’s why the effects will be felt far beyond the Golden State. [The New York Times]

Senator Kamala Harris and other leading Democratic prospects are drawing lessons from Senator Bernie Sanders’s 2016 presidential campaign as they look ahead to 2020. [Politico]

• Mayor Eric Garcetti of Los Angeles budgeted more than $430 million for the city’s homeless, but most of it is in long-term debt. [The Los Angeles Times]

• A state program has resulted in droves of California teenagers pre-registering to vote. But will they actually head to the polls in the fall? [Orange County Register]

• A bankruptcy trustee has filed a lawsuit against Paul Manafort in Santa Ana, saying that the former Trump campaign manager falsely claimed he was a creditor in a failed real estate deal. [Reuters]

Ashley Judd sued Harvey Weinstein in Los Angeles Superior Court, saying he harmed her career by spreading lies about her after she denied his sexual requests. [The New York Times]

Photo

Whole Foods has been criticized for partnering with a Southern California restaurant named Yellow Fever.

Credit
via Facebook

• When an Asian restaurant called Yellow Fever opened its third location at a Whole Foods 365 store in Long Beach, public debate erupted over disparaging language and corporate America. [The New York Times]

• Is it possible to live in San Francisco without spending any money? A new type of bargain hunter is emerging in the city, which is full of venture-capital-backed start-ups offering free trials and discounts. [The Wall Street Journal]

• A seven-mile stretch of Highway 1 that has been closed since landslides in Big Sur last spring is expected to reopen in September. [San Francisco Chronicle]

• U.C. Berkeley students who survived the 2016 terrorist attack in Nice, France, are launching start-ups to help counter global terrorism. [Berkeley News]

• Don Nelson, the retired N.B.A. coach, spoke to us about poker, weed and the Warriors’ chances this year. [The New York Times]

Photo

A Roadies tour bus in Joshua Tree National Park.

Credit
Roadies

• A travel company wants to take you on a road trip between San Diego and Las Vegas — via Los Angeles, Palm Springs, Joshua Tree National Park and the Grand Canyon — on a tour bus packed with luxury amenities. [The New York Times]

And Finally …

Photo

The Compton rapper Kendrick Lamar sold more than 3.5 million copies of “DAMN.” and took home the Pulitzer Prize for music.

Credit
Interscope Records, via Associated Press

When Kendrick Lamar won the Pulitzer Prize for music last month, becoming the first rapper to do so, critics and journalists marveled at the genre-breaking victory.

The triumph was more than just historic for residents of South Los Angeles, where Mr. Lamar grew up — it was also profoundly moving, an acknowledgment that their stories mattered.

Young writers and artists in the area have long venerated Mr. Lamar, whose rise from poverty to becoming one of the acclaimed musical writers of his generation is a source of hope and inspiration. Kyland Turner, a young writer and poet from Watts, said Mr. Lamar’s music helped him make sense of his own life and choices at critical moments.

“There was a long time that I didn’t know how to express myself, and Kendrick was that expression for me personally. I was young and trying to make it through the city,” said Mr. Turner, 22. “His first album, that album got me through some of the toughest parts of my life, from being evicted to having friends dying.”

Mr. Turner’s dream is to make it as a songwriter and screenwriter. He’s well on his way. He has built a following through raw performances in spoken-word events around the city, drawing from his life in South L.A.’s neighborhoods. He recently did story-consulting work on a Netflix series about South L.A., “On My Block,” and once performed at the White House.

Mr. Lamar’s Pulitzer win, said Mr. Turner, has provided a rush of inspiration for Mr. Turner and others like him.

“We knew about Kendrick before the world knew about him. To see his growth over time and for him to stay true to his community, just on a personal level growing up in the city, in L.A., Watts, Compton — it made me feel like, man, I can make it,” Mr. Turner said.

California Today goes live at 6 a.m. Pacific time weekdays. Tell us what you want to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com.

California Today is edited by Julie Bloom, who grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from U.C. Berkeley.

Continue reading the main story

California Today: California Today: Can San Diego Ditch the Power Company?


One of the most heated debates is taking place in San Diego, where backers of such a plan are touting the prospect of lower electricity rates along with increased use of alternative energy like solar and wind power. That’s a potent promise in a state where concern over climate change and global warming has been prominent.

When a community choice program begins, the government moves all electricity customers in their service area into the new program. Consumers must opt out if they want to go back to their previous provider. The traditional utilities are typically required to maintain the network of power lines and often the billing for all customers.

California’s shareholder-owned utilities — Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern California Edison and San Diego Gas and Electric Company — argue that the required services will impose higher costs on them and ultimately their remaining customers.

And with a political-style ad campaign, the San Diego utility has raised the specter of a return to the blackouts that marked the California energy crisis. “San Diegans and Californians are no strangers to rolling blackouts caused by deregulation that triggered an energy crisis,” a narrator says in the ad while a statement flashes on the screen, stating, “Remember the California Electricity Crisis?”

The City Council is expected to vote by year’s end on whether to approve the plan.

California Online

(Please note: We regularly highlight articles on news sites that have limited access for nonsubscribers.)

Photo

Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, has been arrested and is suspected of being the Golden State Killer.

Credit
Jason Henry for The New York Times

• Read our story on the Golden State Killer, a taunting, conniving and elusive prey. [The New York Times]

• The arrest of a suspect has set off alarms among some scientists and ethicists worried that consumer DNA may be widely accessed by law enforcement. [The New York Times]

• And we look back through California television reports, newspaper articles and even advertisements to give you a sense of what it was like to follow the news of the Golden State Killer, as it happened. [The New York Times]

• In the 1970s, Sacramento and its suburbs were growing. It was a safe, small town — a place where children roamed neighborhoods unsupervised. The East Area Rapist stole that innocence. [The Sacramento Bee]

In other news:

Photo

Members of the migrant caravan at the border wall in Tijuana on Sunday.

Credit
Meghan Dhaliwal for The New York Times

• A caravan of immigrants finally reached the border between the United States and Mexico, but the migrants were told that the immigration officials could not process their claims — and that they would have to spend the night on the Mexican side of the border. [The New York Times]

• In a two-part series, Bay Area News Group reporters give us “The Ghost Ship Videos” — a newly obtained collection of police body-camera footage that offers a window into what the Oakland police knew about the dangerous warehouse and what happened the night it burned down. [The Mercury News & The East Bay Times]

• Here we go: Senator Kamala Harris is spending aggressively to bolster her digital campaign infrastructure and cultivate supporters online. [Politico]

• A funeral was held on Friday for Diante Yarber, who died in a police shooting this month. The names of the officers who fired at him have yet to be released. [The New York Times]

Photo

Jennifer and Sarah Hart with four of their children in 2014.

Credit
Thomas Boyd/The Oregonian, via Associated Press

• Dozens of pages of recently released reports show that the Hart family, whose matriarch drove them off a cliff last month, hid a dark home life from view. [The New York Times]

• Growers across California are increasingly turning to the visa program, called H-2A, which is meant to supplement the domestic farm labor force. In Riverside County, for instance, farmworkers with guest visas have increased tenfold in two years. [The Desert Sun]

• Los Angeles transit officials have invested $300,000 on 15 of what they call “play streets” in the neighborhoods of Boyle Heights and Koreatown. They hope the streets will become places for bingo, seesaws and refuge, rather than a home for speeding cars. [The New York Times]

• Everyone knows traffic is impossible and BART is jammed. So Bay Area commuters are turning to the ferry. [The San Francisco Chronicle]

• What’s the median employee pay at Facebook? Oh, just $240,430. [The San Francisco Chronicle]

Photo

Bob Bradley, the coach of Los Angeles F.C., with some of the team’s owners at a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

Credit
Monica Almeida for The New York Times

• Los Angeles has a new Major League Soccer team: the Los Angeles F.C. What will that mean for the Los Angeles Galaxy, the original M.L.S. glamour club? [The New York Times]

• Meet The New California Counterculture: College Republicans [Buzzfeed]

• The Angels are giving their two-way player Shohei Ohtani the full gorilla treatment. Read this story to figure out what we mean. [The New York Times]

San Francisco has long been among the world’s most elegant and refined ballet companies — but sometimes in past seasons it has seemed too polite and demure. Not so with “Unbound.” [The New York Times]

• In “State of Resistance,” Manuel Pastor argues that at just the moment California seems most out of sync with national trends, it is in fact regaining its role as a bellwether and pioneer. James Fallows, a national correspondent for The Atlantic, writes our review. [The New York Times]

Larry Harvey, the driving force behind Burning Man, the globally celebrated anti-establishment festival that he and a friend began 32 years ago on a San Francisco beach, died on Saturday. He was 70. [The New York Times]

Coming up this week

• ’NSync is getting a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Monday.

Apple’s Q2 earnings are due out Tuesday.

• A court hearing for Robert Durst — the New York real estate heir charged with murdering his friend Susan Berman — is scheduled for Thursday in Los Angeles.

• The Steinbeck Festival kicks off Friday in Monterey.

And Finally …

Photo

Dr. Chris Lowe of the California State University Long Beach Shark Lab with a great white shark.

Credit
California State University Long Beach Shark Lab

There is a shark lab at California State University, Long Beach and experts there are trying to track an interesting trend.

“For the last 10 to 15 years, we’ve seen an increase in the number of white sharks,” Chris Lowe, the lab’s director, said in a news release last week. “We believe this comeback is connected to environmental protections that were established several decades ago.”

“The good news is that they are coming back,” Dr. Lowe continued. “The tricky part is that we lack the tools to monitor them.”

So Assemblyman Patrick O’Donnell, a Democrat of Long Beach, has introduced a bill that would make grant funding available for the kind of research the lab seeks to perform.

At the moment, officials say the lab is so overextended, researchers have run out of shark tags. Mr. O’Donnell called it a “human, environmental and economic issue.”

“This is jeopardizing our efforts to learn about white shark behavior and help lifeguards and law enforcement better inform the public about beach safety,” Dr. Lowe said.

The bill cleared a committee last week and will now move to appropriations.

California Today goes live at 6 a.m. Pacific time weekdays. Tell us what you want to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com.

California Today is edited by Julie Bloom, who grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from U.C. Berkeley.

Continue reading the main story

California Today: California Today: Can San Diego Ditch the Power Company?


One of the most heated debates is taking place in San Diego, where backers of such a plan are touting the prospect of lower electricity rates along with increased use of alternative energy like solar and wind power. That’s a potent promise in a state where concern over climate change and global warming has been prominent.

When a community choice program begins, the government moves all electricity customers in their service area into the new program. Consumers must opt out if they want to go back to their previous provider. The traditional utilities are typically required to maintain the network of power lines and often the billing for all customers.

California’s shareholder-owned utilities — Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Southern California Edison and San Diego Gas and Electric Company — argue that the required services will impose higher costs on them and ultimately their remaining customers.

And with a political-style ad campaign, the San Diego utility has raised the specter of a return to the blackouts that marked the California energy crisis. “San Diegans and Californians are no strangers to rolling blackouts caused by deregulation that triggered an energy crisis,” a narrator says in the ad while a statement flashes on the screen, stating, “Remember the California Electricity Crisis?”

The City Council is expected to vote by year’s end on whether to approve the plan.

California Online

(Please note: We regularly highlight articles on news sites that have limited access for nonsubscribers.)

Photo

Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, has been arrested and is suspected of being the Golden State Killer.

Credit
Jason Henry for The New York Times

• Read our story on the Golden State Killer, a taunting, conniving and elusive prey. [The New York Times]

• The arrest of a suspect has set off alarms among some scientists and ethicists worried that consumer DNA may be widely accessed by law enforcement. [The New York Times]

• And we look back through California television reports, newspaper articles and even advertisements to give you a sense of what it was like to follow the news of the Golden State Killer, as it happened. [The New York Times]

• In the 1970s, Sacramento and its suburbs were growing. It was a safe, small town — a place where children roamed neighborhoods unsupervised. The East Area Rapist stole that innocence. [The Sacramento Bee]

In other news:

Photo

Members of the migrant caravan at the border wall in Tijuana on Sunday.

Credit
Meghan Dhaliwal for The New York Times

• A caravan of immigrants finally reached the border between the United States and Mexico, but the migrants were told that the immigration officials could not process their claims — and that they would have to spend the night on the Mexican side of the border. [The New York Times]

• In a two-part series, Bay Area News Group reporters give us “The Ghost Ship Videos” — a newly obtained collection of police body-camera footage that offers a window into what the Oakland police knew about the dangerous warehouse and what happened the night it burned down. [The Mercury News & The East Bay Times]

• Here we go: Senator Kamala Harris is spending aggressively to bolster her digital campaign infrastructure and cultivate supporters online. [Politico]

• A funeral was held on Friday for Diante Yarber, who died in a police shooting this month. The names of the officers who fired at him have yet to be released. [The New York Times]

Photo

Jennifer and Sarah Hart with four of their children in 2014.

Credit
Thomas Boyd/The Oregonian, via Associated Press

• Dozens of pages of recently released reports show that the Hart family, whose matriarch drove them off a cliff last month, hid a dark home life from view. [The New York Times]

• Growers across California are increasingly turning to the visa program, called H-2A, which is meant to supplement the domestic farm labor force. In Riverside County, for instance, farmworkers with guest visas have increased tenfold in two years. [The Desert Sun]

• Los Angeles transit officials have invested $300,000 on 15 of what they call “play streets” in the neighborhoods of Boyle Heights and Koreatown. They hope the streets will become places for bingo, seesaws and refuge, rather than a home for speeding cars. [The New York Times]

• Everyone knows traffic is impossible and BART is jammed. So Bay Area commuters are turning to the ferry. [The San Francisco Chronicle]

• What’s the median employee pay at Facebook? Oh, just $240,430. [The San Francisco Chronicle]

Photo

Bob Bradley, the coach of Los Angeles F.C., with some of the team’s owners at a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

Credit
Monica Almeida for The New York Times

• Los Angeles has a new Major League Soccer team: the Los Angeles F.C. What will that mean for the Los Angeles Galaxy, the original M.L.S. glamour club? [The New York Times]

• Meet The New California Counterculture: College Republicans [Buzzfeed]

• The Angels are giving their two-way player Shohei Ohtani the full gorilla treatment. Read this story to figure out what we mean. [The New York Times]

San Francisco has long been among the world’s most elegant and refined ballet companies — but sometimes in past seasons it has seemed too polite and demure. Not so with “Unbound.” [The New York Times]

• In “State of Resistance,” Manuel Pastor argues that at just the moment California seems most out of sync with national trends, it is in fact regaining its role as a bellwether and pioneer. James Fallows, a national correspondent for The Atlantic, writes our review. [The New York Times]

Larry Harvey, the driving force behind Burning Man, the globally celebrated anti-establishment festival that he and a friend began 32 years ago on a San Francisco beach, died on Saturday. He was 70. [The New York Times]

Coming up this week

• ’NSync is getting a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Monday.

Apple’s Q2 earnings are due out Tuesday.

• A court hearing for Robert Durst — the New York real estate heir charged with murdering his friend Susan Berman — is scheduled for Thursday in Los Angeles.

• The Steinbeck Festival kicks off Friday in Monterey.

And Finally …

Photo

Dr. Chris Lowe of the California State University Long Beach Shark Lab with a great white shark.

Credit
California State University Long Beach Shark Lab

There is a shark lab at California State University, Long Beach and experts there are trying to track an interesting trend.

“For the last 10 to 15 years, we’ve seen an increase in the number of white sharks,” Chris Lowe, the lab’s director, said in a news release last week. “We believe this comeback is connected to environmental protections that were established several decades ago.”

“The good news is that they are coming back,” Dr. Lowe continued. “The tricky part is that we lack the tools to monitor them.”

So Assemblyman Patrick O’Donnell, a Democrat of Long Beach, has introduced a bill that would make grant funding available for the kind of research the lab seeks to perform.

At the moment, officials say the lab is so overextended, researchers have run out of shark tags. Mr. O’Donnell called it a “human, environmental and economic issue.”

“This is jeopardizing our efforts to learn about white shark behavior and help lifeguards and law enforcement better inform the public about beach safety,” Dr. Lowe said.

The bill cleared a committee last week and will now move to appropriations.

California Today goes live at 6 a.m. Pacific time weekdays. Tell us what you want to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com.

California Today is edited by Julie Bloom, who grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from U.C. Berkeley.

Continue reading the main story

California Today: California Today: How the Golden State Killer Suspect Was Caught


My colleagues Jennifer Medina and Jose A. Del Real spoke to several victims and members of their families.

As one relative noted: “This not a club anyone really wants to be a member of.”

You can read their article here.

More from The New York Times:

• What do we know about Joseph James DeAngelo? Let us explain. [The New York Times]

• Mr. DeAngelo lived in Citrus Heights — a suburban neighborhood east of Sacramento that one resident called “quiet, sweet,” and “boring.” [The New York Times]

• The Golden State Killer’s barrage of rapes and murders began in 1976 and seemed to have ended by 1986. Why, sometimes, do serial killers just stop? [The New York Times]

Additional coverage:

• Investigators were digging in Mr. DeAngelo’s backyard on Thursday, but by the early evening had not uncovered anything. [The Los Angeles Times]

• One longtime cold case investigator had tracked Mr. DeAngelo to his door. But then he drove home. [The Mercury News]

• “There was nothing really while he was working at the Auburn Police Department that would say he was a mass murderer,” his former boss said. [CBS Sacramento]

• Did military and law enforcement training help the suspect evade capture? [The Sacramento Bee]

• How about a middle-class life? [The Los Angeles Times]

• This audio slide show takes you through the headlines from 1979 to 2018. [The Sacramento Bee]

• Here are a few podcasts, videos and stories that take deep dives into what was, until recently, a cold case. [Vox]

• Mr. DeAngelo’s first court appearance is scheduled for Friday at 1:30 p.m. in Sacramento. [SFGate]

California Online

(Please note: We regularly highlight articles on news sites that have limited access for nonsubscribers.)

Photo

A bus carrying migrants in Tijuana on Wednesday.

Credit
Meghan Dhaliwal for The New York Times

Hundreds of migrants who arrived in Tijuana this week after a month traveling are planning to walk to the border crossing on Sunday. Many believe that now, only President Trump stands in their way. [The New York Times]

San Joaquin County supervisors have stripped their sheriff of his responsibilities in death investigations after allegations surfaced that he used his political office to shield officers who killed civilians. [KQED]

• California regulators have fined Pacific Gas and Electric Co. $97.5 million for “improper back-channel communications” after the deadly 2010 San Bruno pipeline blast. [The San Francisco Chronicle]

Photo

A demonstration at the University of California, Berkeley in February 2017.

Credit
Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

• Conservative groups at the University of California, Berkeley can sue the school over the restrictions officials placed on high-profile speakers, a judge has ruled. [SFGate]

• A $9 billion water bond has enough signatures to qualify for the ballot in November. [Capital Public Radio]

• The N.F.L. Draft began on Thursday. Sam Darnold, of Southern California, was picked third by the Jets; Josh Rosen, of U.C.L.A., went 10th to the Arizona Cardinals. [The New York Times]

• Here’s an analysis of all 32 picks in the first round. [The New York Times]

And Finally …

Photo

A proposed aerial tram would transport fans from downtown Los Angeles to Dodger Stadium in minutes.

Credit
Aerial Rapid Transit Technologies LLC

For baseball fans in Los Angeles, there are few things better than soaking in a perfect California sunset at Dodger Stadium.

The problem is getting there.

Traffic on Sunset Boulevard at 5:30 p.m. on a game night is the stuff of legend. Buses fill a dedicated lane, drivers flee to side streets, and still, making first pitch can feel nearly impossible.

Under this kind of duress, it’s likely that at least a few Angelenos have fantasied at the wheel about one day being able to soar over the congestion and float to the front of Chavez Ravine.

Perhaps, by 2022, they will be able to do just that.

On Thursday, Aerial Rapid Transit Technologies announced plans for what is effectively a gondola lift that would send passengers from downtown’s Union Station to Dodger Stadium in about five minutes.

The proposal, which was submitted to Metro’s Office of Extraordinary Innovation this week, was first reported by The Los Angeles Times.

Officials said the system would whisk more than 5,000 riders per hour in each direction, eliminating hundreds of thousands of annual car trips.

Its price tag? $125 million, funded in part by Aerial Rapid Transit Technologies and in part by other private financing.

In a telephone interview, the mayor of Los Angeles, Eric M. Garcetti, said there would be no cost to taxpayers. He said he expected that rides would cost a “few bucks” — a “single digit” dollar amount.

“I’ve dreamed about this for years,” said Mr. Garcetti, who has lived just blocks from Dodger Stadium. “Traffic is so terrible at Dodgers games. It’s the only bad thing you experience — short of a loss, of course.”

Officials say public review could begin by the end of this year. In a prepared statement, the Los Angeles Dodgers expressed support for the project, calling it “important and innovative.”

And already on Thursday, Mr. Garcetti was imagining Vin Scully’s voice welcoming fans to the aerial tram.

“People don’t think of L.A. as a romantic city,” he said. “But I think it’s as romantic as Paris or any other city in the world. And this would just kind of cement it.”

California Today goes live at 6 a.m. Pacific time weekdays. Tell us what you want to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com.

California Today is edited by Julie Bloom, who grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from U.C. Berkeley.

Continue reading the main story

California Today: California Today: How the Golden State Killer Suspect Was Caught


My colleagues Jennifer Medina and Jose A. Del Real spoke to several victims and members of their families.

As one relative noted: “This not a club anyone really wants to be a member of.”

You can read their article here.

More from The New York Times:

• What do we know about Joseph James DeAngelo? Let us explain. [The New York Times]

• Mr. DeAngelo lived in Citrus Heights — a suburban neighborhood east of Sacramento that one resident called “quiet, sweet,” and “boring.” [The New York Times]

• The Golden State Killer’s barrage of rapes and murders began in 1976 and seemed to have ended by 1986. Why, sometimes, do serial killers just stop? [The New York Times]

Additional coverage:

• Investigators were digging in Mr. DeAngelo’s backyard on Thursday, but by the early evening had not uncovered anything. [The Los Angeles Times]

• One longtime cold case investigator had tracked Mr. DeAngelo to his door. But then he drove home. [The Mercury News]

• “There was nothing really while he was working at the Auburn Police Department that would say he was a mass murderer,” his former boss said. [CBS Sacramento]

• Did military and law enforcement training help the suspect evade capture? [The Sacramento Bee]

• How about a middle-class life? [The Los Angeles Times]

• This audio slide show takes you through the headlines from 1979 to 2018. [The Sacramento Bee]

• Here are a few podcasts, videos and stories that take deep dives into what was, until recently, a cold case. [Vox]

• Mr. DeAngelo’s first court appearance is scheduled for Friday at 1:30 p.m. in Sacramento. [SFGate]

California Online

(Please note: We regularly highlight articles on news sites that have limited access for nonsubscribers.)

Photo

A bus carrying migrants in Tijuana on Wednesday.

Credit
Meghan Dhaliwal for The New York Times

Hundreds of migrants who arrived in Tijuana this week after a month traveling are planning to walk to the border crossing on Sunday. Many believe that now, only President Trump stands in their way. [The New York Times]

San Joaquin County supervisors have stripped their sheriff of his responsibilities in death investigations after allegations surfaced that he used his political office to shield officers who killed civilians. [KQED]

• California regulators have fined Pacific Gas and Electric Co. $97.5 million for “improper back-channel communications” after the deadly 2010 San Bruno pipeline blast. [The San Francisco Chronicle]

Photo

A demonstration at the University of California, Berkeley in February 2017.

Credit
Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

• Conservative groups at the University of California, Berkeley can sue the school over the restrictions officials placed on high-profile speakers, a judge has ruled. [SFGate]

• A $9 billion water bond has enough signatures to qualify for the ballot in November. [Capital Public Radio]

• The N.F.L. Draft began on Thursday. Sam Darnold, of Southern California, was picked third by the Jets; Josh Rosen, of U.C.L.A., went 10th to the Arizona Cardinals. [The New York Times]

• Here’s an analysis of all 32 picks in the first round. [The New York Times]

And Finally …

Photo

A proposed aerial tram would transport fans from downtown Los Angeles to Dodger Stadium in minutes.

Credit
Aerial Rapid Transit Technologies LLC

For baseball fans in Los Angeles, there are few things better than soaking in a perfect California sunset at Dodger Stadium.

The problem is getting there.

Traffic on Sunset Boulevard at 5:30 p.m. on a game night is the stuff of legend. Buses fill a dedicated lane, drivers flee to side streets, and still, making first pitch can feel nearly impossible.

Under this kind of duress, it’s likely that at least a few Angelenos have fantasied at the wheel about one day being able to soar over the congestion and float to the front of Chavez Ravine.

Perhaps, by 2022, they will be able to do just that.

On Thursday, Aerial Rapid Transit Technologies announced plans for what is effectively a gondola lift that would send passengers from downtown’s Union Station to Dodger Stadium in about five minutes.

The proposal, which was submitted to Metro’s Office of Extraordinary Innovation this week, was first reported by The Los Angeles Times.

Officials said the system would whisk more than 5,000 riders per hour in each direction, eliminating hundreds of thousands of annual car trips.

Its price tag? $125 million, funded in part by Aerial Rapid Transit Technologies and in part by other private financing.

In a telephone interview, the mayor of Los Angeles, Eric M. Garcetti, said there would be no cost to taxpayers. He said he expected that rides would cost a “few bucks” — a “single digit” dollar amount.

“I’ve dreamed about this for years,” said Mr. Garcetti, who has lived just blocks from Dodger Stadium. “Traffic is so terrible at Dodgers games. It’s the only bad thing you experience — short of a loss, of course.”

Officials say public review could begin by the end of this year. In a prepared statement, the Los Angeles Dodgers expressed support for the project, calling it “important and innovative.”

And already on Thursday, Mr. Garcetti was imagining Vin Scully’s voice welcoming fans to the aerial tram.

“People don’t think of L.A. as a romantic city,” he said. “But I think it’s as romantic as Paris or any other city in the world. And this would just kind of cement it.”

California Today goes live at 6 a.m. Pacific time weekdays. Tell us what you want to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com.

California Today is edited by Julie Bloom, who grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from U.C. Berkeley.

Continue reading the main story

California Today: California Today: After Three Decades, Finally, an Arrest


• And you may recall this newsletter linking to a story about “I’ll Be Gone in the Dark,” a chilling true crime book about the Golden State Killer. The writer Michelle McNamara spent the final years of her life chasing him. (And she wrote about it in this Los Angeles Magazine story in 2013.) She died in April 2016, before she could see the killer brought to justice, or her book published. Now her husband, the comedian Patton Oswalt, has a lot of questions for Mr. DeAngelo.

Read our article about Ms. McNamara and Mr. Oswalt here.

California Online

(Please note: We regularly highlight articles on news sites that have limited access for nonsubscribers.)

Photo

Supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program demonstrated outside the Capitol last month.

Credit
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Moveon.org

• In a huge setback for the Trump administration, a federal judge ruled that DACA protections must stay in place and that the government must resume accepting new applications. [The New York Times]

• For many young undocumented immigrants, the ruling provided an unusual amount of hope. But it has been a wild ride. We lay out all of their highs and lows. [The New York Times]

• An audit released this week found that the California State University system exposes students and employees to many on-campus hazards like faulty laboratory equipment, unsafe drinking water, asbestos and chemical spills. [Capital Public Radio]

• Republican activists say they have enough signatures to start an initiative that would repeal recent increases in California’s gas tax and vehicle fees. The initiative would go on the November ballot. [The Los Angeles Times]

• A new poll shows that Gavin Newsom and Antonio Villaraigosa lead the race for governor. But the top Republican in the field, John Cox, is within striking distance of finishing in the top two. [The Orange County Register]

Photo

Bogus accounts bearing the likenesses of the Facebook executives have frequently been used to scam users.

Credit
Illustration by Tony Cenicola/The New York Times, Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg photographs by Getty Images

• An examination by The New York Times found 205 accounts that impersonate Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg on Facebook and Instagram. At least 51 of them were lottery scams that sought to swindle users out of their money. [The New York Times]

• A contract employee has filed a lawsuit alleging that Tesla and a contracting company failed to fully pay workers like her for overtime and denied them legally mandated meal and rest breaks. [The Mercury News]

• More than 20,000 Californians were sterilized to prevent them from having babies under the state’s eugenics law. The state abolished the law in 1979, and now lawmakers are considering paying reparations. [The Washington Post]

• Many of the state’s sober-living homes are rife with the very drug and alcohol use the homes are supposed to prevent. Some are privately owned and hard to regulate. But there are five proposals on the table that would try. [CALmatters]

Gun deaths fell in California over a 16-year period ending in 2015, according to a recent study of firearm violence. There’s been a decline in gang violence and homicide rates are falling among black and Hispanic male victims, the study found. [The Associated Press]

• A lawsuit accusing the music mogul Russell Simmons of raping a woman at his home in Los Angeles has been dropped. [The New York Times]

Photo

Students in the Technology and Applied Composition program at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music.

Credit
Sewon Barrera

• The San Francisco Conservatory of Music has received a $46.4 million donation that will help fund construction of a new building. [The New York Times]

Soon-Tek Oh, who worked to broaden the types of roles available to Asian-American actors through East West Players and other theater troupes, died this month in Los Angeles. He was 85. [The New York Times]

And Finally …

Photo

Crates of avocados at a market.

Credit
Nick Wagner/Associated Press

We know, we know. We’ve written about weird museums a lot in this space. So we’ll keep this brief.

There’s a “pop-up experience” coming to San Diego in June called “The CADO” meant to celebrate California’s favorite fruit.

Yes, the website says, there will be food. Yes, you can take photos. And yes, it’s pretty expensive — $27 to be exact.

No, it is not clear if any toast is included.

California Today goes live at 6 a.m. Pacific time weekdays. Tell us what you want to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com.

California Today is edited by Julie Bloom, who grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from U.C. Berkeley.

Continue reading the main story

California Today: California Today: Montecito’s Mud Volunteers


Photo

Carol Bartoli, a volunteer, digging out the living room of a home in Montecito.

Credit
Jim Wilson/The New York Times

Good morning.

(Want to get California Today by email? Here’s the sign-up.)

They call themselves the “second responders.”

Montecito has slipped out of the headlines since torrents of mud and boulders thundered down the mountain in January, killing at least 21 people and destroying around 130 homes.

But a group of volunteers, the Santa Barbara Bucket Brigade, is not finished digging out homes buried in mud and retrieving precious belongings of residents who in some cases have lost nearly everything.

“It’s been a long three months,” said Abe Powell, an electrician who formed the bucket brigade, which has dug out more than 80 homes.

Photo

Slides retrieved from a home in Montecito.

Credit
Jim Wilson/The New York Times

They’ve unearthed a wedding ring, family photos, letters — and troves of muddy documents. The group rented a giant walk-in freezer where items are stored to kill mold.

On a recent morning the brigade descended on a one-story, wooden ranch house wrecked by the mudflows. In what was the living room, a floral patterned love seat was half submerged and Christmas ornaments were caked into the hardened dirt. Volunteers hacked away with pick axes and shovels.

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“It’s a humbling experience to have people digging out your life in front of you,” said Curtis Skene, the owner of the house who narrowly escaped the mudflows by taking shelter behind an olive tree in his garden. “I’m humbled – and grateful.”

Photo

Oprah Winfrey visited with her neighbor Curtis Skene as volunteers helped dig out his home in Montecito.

Credit
Jim Wilson/The New York Times

A day later Oprah Winfrey came to document the dig-out with a camera crew. In a community filled with celebrities, her estate is one street over.

The bucket brigade has dug out both mansions and modest bungalows. They are also trying to save oak trees from suffocation.

Among the diggers is Carol Bartoli, 73, a chef and caterer, who has outlasted some of the younger volunteers. After the mudslide, “the attitude was if the mud is on your property it’s your responsibility,” she said.

“I just thought, I’m going to help.”

With the rainy season all but over, the group works under bright blue skies. But in the hills above Montecito, boulders are perched precariously as if waiting for their cue to tumble.

“If you live between the mountain and the ocean it’s almost par for the course,” said Josiah Hamilton, a real estate agent and a leader of the bucket brigade. “It’s something you have to be prepared for.”

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(Please note: We regularly highlight articles on news sites that have limited access for nonsubscribers.)

Photo


Credit
Illustration by Mike McQuade. Source photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

• How Devin Nunes turned the House Intelligence Committee inside out. [The New York Times]

• A parade of big-name California Republican lawmakers including Kevin McCarthy, Devin Nunes and Mimi Walters have contributed to the campaign to repeal the gas tax. [Sacramento Bee]

Home prices in the Bay Area have reached a new record – a median of $820,000 in March, up 9.3 percent from February and up 14.7 percent from a year ago. It’s no surprise that tech jobs are helping push up the prices; the median annual pay at Facebook is $240,430. [San Francisco Chronicle]

Photo

Queensway Bay in Long Beach, Calif., with the Queen Mary and docks in the distance. A $250 million entertainment and hotel complex is planned for the waterfront next to the Queen Mary.

Credit
Jake Michaels for The New York Times

Long Beach has long struggled to revive its downtown. Now three dozen projects are underway or in the pipeline in one of the country’s largest downtown redevelopments. [The New York Times]

Gavin Newsom, the front-runner in the governor’s race, admitted to a drinking problem a decade ago. Now he says alcohol isn’t a problem: “A little wine” is fine. [San Francisco Chronicle]

• California’s state government is flush with cash. The state’s income tax revenue has continued to far exceed both projections and last year’s totals. In the current fiscal year taxes have totaled over $82 billion, nearly $4 billion ahead of projections and over $9 billion ahead of this point last year. [San Francisco Chronicle]

• In the latest blow to local journalism in California, The Sacramento Bee laid off 14 journalists on Tuesday. [Sacramento Business Journal]

Oakland is struggling to attract women and underrepresented minorities into its police academies. The city’s 179th police academy will add as many as 21 new officers to the city’s streets when it wraps up in July, but there won’t be any women or African Americans in the graduating class. The attrition rate for women in the last three police academies was 62 percent, compared with 33 percent for men. [East Bay Express]

• A Latino activist organization, Hermandad Mexicana, on Tuesday announced a statewide campaign of noncooperation with all police authorities. [Orange County Register]

• A developer wants to build a 260-unit housing complex in Berkeley. Native American groups say the site was once part of an Ohlone settlement that included large mounds of seashells that may have also been a burial ground. [Berkeleyside]

And Finally …

Photo

Katherine Morrow with the portrait of her mother that was rescued from the detritus of the Montecito mudslide.

Credit
Jim Wilson/The New York Times

In her late 50s Katherine Morrow turned to a life of meditation. She whittled down her possessions and rented a small bungalow by a creek in Montecito. But after mud crashed through the house in January, blowing the front door off its hinges, there was one item she hoped to retrieve: a portrait of her late mother drawn by a Canadian artist, Frederick Varley.

Four days after the mudslide she returned with a sheriff’s deputy, wading through thigh-deep mud that was as sticky as peanut butter. Among tree roots and shards of glass, Ms. Morrow spotted the corner of the picture frame. She slipped it out of the muck and brought it to a shop in Santa Barbara that specializes in restoring damaged art. A woman working at the shop entered the piece into the computer as “Mother.” The frame looked like a “mud sandwich,” the restorer said.

Ms. Morrow has now put her possessions into 12 small boxes and is contemplating her next move. She keeps the image of her mother pressed in between sheets of packing foam. “She was a very good mother, very nurturing,” Ms. Morrow said.

California Today goes live at 6 a.m. Pacific time weekdays. Tell us what you want to see: CAtoday@nytimes.com.

California Today is edited by Julie Bloom, who grew up in Los Angeles and graduated from U.C. Berkeley.

Continue reading the main story